Secretary must stand up for public lands

first_imgAs our 26th president, Roosevelt worked tirelessly to stop special interests from developing and privatizing the wild lands that he treasured, conserving more than 230 million acres by establishing 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, four national game preserves, five national parks and 18 national monuments.Sportsmen have applauded Secretary Zinke for some of his Roosevelt-like actions, such as advocating for public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park and proposing the expansion of hunting and fishing on 10 national wildlife refuges.Yet, we will continue to hold the secretary accountable for pursuing the rollback of conservation protections on millions of acres of national monuments, scrapping collaborative habitat management plans for sage grouse, and not fighting administration proposals to cut popular public access programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund.These actions threaten to undermine Roosevelt’s legacy, and I join back-country hunters and anglers in urging Secretary Zinke to do the right thing and stand up for our public lands.John BaroneBallston SpaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGuilderland girls’ soccer team hands BH-BL first league loss Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion When Ryan Zinke was nominated by the Trump administration to oversee more than 500 million acres of our American public lands as interior secretary, sportsmen had high hopes that he would be, in his words, “a Teddy Roosevelt guy.”last_img read more

Lawmakers must take on the NRA

first_imgFor example, following the mass shootings in Parkland, Fla., NRA leaders, House Speaker Paul Ryan and President Trump all insisted that the problem was “mental illness.” However, in depth analyses indicate that the vast majority of mass shootings are not committed by the diagnosable mentally ill. Moreover, only a few percent of all violent acts in our country are committed by individuals who have been diagnosed with a mental illness, and the percentage of crimes they commit with a gun is lower than the national average for persons not diagnosed with mental illness. Thus, even if we could cure all mental illness — a worthy goal — violent crimes would only be reduced by a few percent.While mass shootings capture the headlines, they represent a small percentage of firearm deaths in America. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2015, there were over 33,000 firearm deaths in America. Of these deaths, about 480 were attributed to mass shootings. For years, the NRA has prevented the CDC from doing research into the causes of our very high rates of firearm deaths. It’s time to elect lawmakers who will confront the NRA and allow research into this very serious problem. Moreover, such lawmakers could enact sensible gun laws supported by the majority of Americans, such as banning assault rifles and adopting universal background checks.Don SteinerNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfect Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The National Rifle Association (NRA) and many Republican law makers refuse to acknowledge that the pervasiveness and availability of guns in our country play a major role in our high rate of firearm deaths.last_img read more

AMEC dropped from Manchester scheme

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The pearls of the twinset

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Reading offices: Reading room

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West Midlands – Talk of the Towns

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Cream of the crop

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Hamptons’ £8m profits prompt expansion

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McCabe revamps Fairbriar for ‘aggressive’ UK drive

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First known US child virus death was teen ‘in good health’

first_imgA recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report found juveniles “appear to have milder COVID-19 illness,” with no intensive care admissions or deaths in the US as of March 16.”Similar to reports from other countries, this finding suggests that the risk for serious disease and death from COVID-19 is higher in older age groups,” it found.Only two known cases of minors dying from the disease in China have been recorded. In one case, an infant had a pre-existing intestinal condition. The other’s situation was not known.”The risk for serious disease and death in COVID-19 cases among persons in the United States increases with age,” the CDC report added.California has been one of the worst-hit US states during the pandemic.Los Angeles County — which is home to 10 million residents — has confirmed 662 cases of coronavirus, with at least 11 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tracker. Topics : The first known death of a child due to the novel coronavirus in the United States was a teenager in previously good health, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Tuesday.The death of the youth from Lancaster, just north of Los Angeles, was reported hours earlier by public health officials, and comes despite the disease not typically proving severe for juveniles.”A teenager in good health, succumbed to this virus,” said Garcetti. “To the young people that are out there — this can hit you too. Know that your behavior can save a life, and can take a life. And that life could be yours,” he added.The victim’s identity and sex were not specified.”COVID-19 does not discriminate by age, race or income level,” said Los Angeles County public health director Barbara Ferrer, using the scientific term for the disease caused by the SARS-coV-2 virus.Multiple studies have found COVID-19 disproportionately affects older patients and those with underlying conditions.last_img read more