GOVT EMBARKS ON 74 MILLION ELECTRICITY EXPANSION PROJECT

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Dec. 16 (JIS): Most of the three per cent of rural households that are without electricity will be provided with the service under a $74 million expansion project that the Government has initiated through the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ).The project will be implemented by the Rural Electrification Programme (REP). “The PCJ has allocated $74 million to the REP project, and we are going to take light across to all communities,” said Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell. “We are going to do it in every single parish,” he added.The Minister was addressing a brief ceremony held on Monday (December 15) at the Hyde Park United Church in Brooklyn, Manchester, before switching on lights to serve three communities in the parish. The areas are Mike Town, Evergreen and Brooklyn.Some 70 households in the three communities are now receiving electricity under the project. It was implemented by REP at a cost of $14.5 million, with $3 million coming from the Constituency Development Fund (CDF), through Member of Parliament for North West Manchester, Mikael Phillips.Mr. Phillips, who also addressed the commissioning ceremony, said that with the electricity, residents can now embark on projects to develop the community.He urged them to pay for the energy that they consume.Come next week, lights will be turned on in sections of the Llandilo community of Central Westmoreland.The REP aims to extend electricity to rural Jamaica as part of the Government of Jamaica’s commitment to provide the entire island with access to the service to stimulate economic and social activity, and improve the quality of life of citizens. RESIDENTS WELCOME INTERNET CAFÉ IN TREADWAYS, ST. CATHERINE Students Of Cavaliers All-Age Receive Tablet Computers Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:Mikael Phillips, Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica, phillip paulwell NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY STRATEGY LAUNCHEDlast_img read more

Seward PD Seek Public Assistance In Locating Shoplifter

first_imgAnyone with information is asked to contact the Seward Police Department at (907) 224-3338 with any information. Reference case #19-2042. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Seward Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identify a shoplifter from a case that occured in Seward on July 9.According to SPD, the suspect may be driving a green 1993 Oldsmobile Bravada with a spider-webbed windshield and a storage rack on the back (Alaska License JMM914).last_img

SELECTMEN NEWS Committee Created To Propose Changes To Annual Town Meeting

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Changes may be on the way for Annual Town Meeting, but not anytime in the immediate future.At Monday’s meeting, Selectman Mike McCoy asked his colleagues to put an article on this year’s Town Meeting warrant asking voters to change the dates of the Annual Town Election and Annual Town Meeting. McCoy noted the recent Bylaw Review Committee, which he served on, was supportive of changing the date of Annual Town Meeting.Under McCoy’s proposal, the Town Election would fall on the third Saturday of March and the Town Meeting would fall on the fourth Saturday of March. McCoy felt turnout would increase with less conflicts predicted in late March as compared to early May, when First Communions, spring youth sports, and yard work are all in full swing.While his colleagues didn’t necessarily dismiss the idea, they opted not to support it. Instead, Selectmen unanimously agreed to form a Town Meeting Review Committee on the suggestion of Town Moderator Robert Peterson, Jr.“I have no opposition to moving Town Meeting… but I ask the board when moving the date, that you consider taking a holistic approach to the issue of Town Meeting,” Peterson told the board. “I do strongly suggest the Town consider doing some sort of Town Meeting Review Committee…. There are things we can look at to speed the process along, whether it be consent agendas or electronic voting…”“I think Mr. Peterson’s idea is a great idea,” responded Selectman Jonathan Eaton. “I’d rather a solution come from the community than this board. I don’t want to make a change now and then have to change it again next year. My preference is to start a committee as soon as possible and solicit feedback. There’s a lot of good in the survey we’ve conducted, but we have a lot of questions that we need to do some more digging on.”“I agree. Let’s have a review committee. But let’s add a caveat that they need to have something decided in time so we can put something on warrant for next year’s meeting. Let’s get it going now so it’s ready for next year’s warrant,” agreed Selectman Ed Loud.“I’d be inclined to develop a subcommittee and for them to come back and give us a report on which way to go,” concurred Selectman Kevin Caira.The makeup of the Committee is yet to be fleshed out, but it sounded like each Selectman will appoint three members to a 15-member committee.All Selectman also seemed unanimous in their desire to keep the Town Meeting on Saturday, as opposed to moving it to a weeknight or multiple weeknights.“I’m concerned about seniors, some of which are less likely to drive at night,” pointed out Selectman Greg Bendel, who was also cool to the idea of a March Town Meeting. “I worry about a March Meeting. We had 5-6 snow days at school last March. We’d still be running into winter weather. What would happen if Town Meeting were to get snowed out, which unfortunately is a possibility in New England in March.”“This is an impossible problem to try to solve. 23,000 people live in Wilmington,” added Selectman Eaton. “There’s always going to be a conflict… A lot of the themes I saw [in the town meeting survey] was that weeknights weren’t good for seniors, but weekends were tough for parents.”Town Manager Jeff Hull cautioned that moving the Town Meeting too early in the year would create issues for the town’s budget process.“The Governor doesn’t present his budget [which includes state aid, the town’s second largest revenue source] until the end of January. If we have a Town Meeting at the end of March, I have to present the budget to the Board of Selectmen at the end of December, well before the Governor’s,” explained Hull. “It just creates a greater level of uncertainty when putting the budget together.”“Clearly we had some past Town Meetings – like the new high school vote – where a significant amount of people showed up. To some measure, [attendance] is a function of what the topics are at the Town Meeting,” Hull later added. “When people really want to turn out – hockey rink, new High School, new Middle School — people turn out when there are issues that they want to be heard on. I’m not sure that any particular date is going to solicit a groundswell of interest.”Any date change would need Town Meeting approval and then require an act of the State Legislature.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSelectmen & Residents Are Ready To “Fix” Annual Town Meeting, Possibly Move It From Saturday To 2-3 WeeknightsIn “Government”SELECTMEN NEWS: Town Clerk Concerned With Moving Town Meeting To March; Review Committee To Be Appointed SoonIn “Government”ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE GETS TO WORK: 20 Building Projects Happening In Town RIGHT NOWIn “Business”last_img read more

How Will NRG Selling Its Renewable Energy Business Affect Green Energy In

first_img Share NRG just announced it’s selling its renewable energy business. The move is part of a corporate reorganization move the company announced last summer.What impact could this have on Houston’s renewable future? Does the move have any impact on Houston’s future in renewable energy?Houston Matters explores the ramifications of NRG’s decision with Dr. Gavin Dillingham, program director for clean energy policy at the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and Lara Cottingham, deputy assistant director for the City of Houston’s Administration and Regulatory Affairs Department.last_img

Spotifys India Launch Hits Snag as Warner Music Sues

first_imgJust before Spotify’s public listing in April of 2018, the company announced that it had opened an office in Mumbai and hired 300 people, but it faces a steep challenge in India. In addition to the fierce competition from local streamers like Saavn and Gaana (which sources say Spotify had considered purchasing in the past), Spotify could be staring down a potentially slow conversion from free to premium, and large sections of the country have broadband difficulties; although Internet access is inexpensive in India, infrastructure is still developing in many areas. However, Spotify faced similar challenges in Indonesia and Africa, and launched in those territories anyway.India, a country with 1.33 billion people and dozens of dialects, consumes music in five languages including Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Bengali. UPDATED: Spotify’s long-anticipated launch in India could be days away, but the Swedish company is taking its licensing negotiations with the three major music groups to the wire. While the streamer says it has closed licensing deals with Universal Music Group and Sony Music, it remains “far apart” from acceptable terms with Warner Music Group.As a workaround, Spotify is claiming a statutory license meant for TV and radio broadcasters; in response, Warner filed an injunction in India that aims to bar Spotify’s access to songs published by the major’s Warner/Chappell company, which holds the rights to more than 1 million songs. The dispute has become contentious as Spotify accused Warner of “abusive behavior” that harms “many non-Warner artists, labels and publishers.”In a statement to Variety, a Warner Music spokesperson says: “After months of negotiations, Spotify abruptly changed course and has falsely asserted a statutory license for our songwriters’ music publishing rights in India. We had no choice but to ask an Indian court for an injunction to prevent this. It’s our goal to hammer out a deal that works for everyone. We hope this is just a speed bump in the expansion of our long and successful global partnership.” ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 A Spotify spokesperson responded: “Warner Music Group instructed Warner/Chappell Music to file for an injunction in an attempt to leverage WCM’s local Indian publishing rights, to extract concessions in WMG’s global renewal negotiations for musical recordings. WMG revoked a previously agreed upon publishing license for reasons wholly unrelated to Spotify’s launch in India. All other major labels and publishers have already agreed on economics and to license their music, and Spotify has also entered into a license with the local collecting society, while WCM remains the lone hold-out needed for a Spotify launch in India. WMG’s abusive behavior would harm many non-Warner artists, labels and publishers, and prevent Spotify from competing in the market, leaving us no choice but to file for a statutory license. This statutory license, which allows for application to internet-based services, prevents WMG’s abusive practices, while ensuring all rights holders are compensated fairly. Under the statutory license, Spotify will pay WCM and their rights holders rates that are in-line with the rates Spotify agreed to pay the leading Indian music entities. We will continue to assess our options at this stage.”Spotify’s launch in India, the world’s second most-populous country, has already been postponed at least twice, and the delay is not helping the company’s reputation on Wall Street; Spotify’s stock has dropped significantly, along with most major tech companies, since its its successful public listing last April. Warner has less than 5% market share in India, and the majors are significantly less dominant in that country than they are in most Western countries, although Warner/Chappell publishes songs on multiple labels. While the announcement in January that Spotify has inked a content deal with T-Series, the country’s leading music and film company, ensures that it will be rolling out with plenty of popular content, the importance of securing deals with the majors seems to be reflected in the strong language in its statement. Popular on Variety last_img read more

HMC ensures errorfree data collection to check vectorborne diseases

first_imgKolkata: Howrah Municipal Corporation (HMC) has taken a major step to ensure error free collection of data for a survey report that needs to be prepared to check vector-borne diseases.For the first time, the top brass of the civic body, starting from Mayor to ward councillors, will visit different areas to supervise the data collection process of the health workers.There are around 2,500 health workers under the HMC. They visit door to door to collect data and based on the same, a report is prepared. It is the survey report on which the senior officials of the civic body rely while chalking out a plan of action to check vector-borne diseases. As per the plan of action, all tasks are carried out to ensure the same. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe need of supervising the data collection process was realised during a meeting held on Monday and the work in this regard has started in full swing from Tuesday onwards.When contacted, Bhaskar Bhattacharjee, Member Mayor-in-Council (Health), said: “The step has been taken to ensure that the health workers collect the data properly as there are various technical aspects into the collection of data.”On Thursday, Bhattacharjee himself visited ward number 63 to verify the data that is being collected by the health workers and councilors are also assisting the health workers in carrying out the survey. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPIt is helping the health workers to be more informed about the process of data collection.Once the data collection is done, it will be compiled into a single report by the concerned officers of the civic body’s health department and there will be a detailed discussion on the report to prepare the plan of action to take vector control measures. It may be mentioned that the HMC has already formed a high power monitoring committee for better execution of work to check-vector borne diseases and the committee is headed by Mayor Dr Rathin Chakraborty.Bijin Krishna, commissioner, is the convenor, and Bhattacharjee and other senior officials are members of the committee. The committee members will hold a meeting every week to take proactive steps so that people do not face any problem due to vector-borne diseases in any of the 66 wards of the civic body.last_img read more

Private publishing houses to be under govt scanner post Milkha Singh goofup

first_imgKolkata: The state government will now keep an eye on the private book publishing houses and will take action, particularly in case of misinformation or wrong portrayal of famous personalities in books.The decision was taken in a meeting with a number of publishers in the city, that was chaired by state Education minister Partha Chatterjee. The meeting was held in the wake of actor Farhan Akhtar pointing out a blooper in a Bengali book that had depicted him as legendary athlete Milkha Singh. The actor had tweeted on Sunday, urging state Education minister Partha Chatterjee to request the publisher to recall and replace the book.It may be mentioned that the state Education department has already identified the publisher as Anomy Publication, situated at 57/1A, College Street. The owner of the publishing house has claimed that it was a big mistake on their part and said that they have already started withdrawing the copies of the books that have been circulated.last_img read more

March 22 2002 A few weeks ago we found this Emu r

first_imgMarch 22, 2002 A few weeks ago wefound this Emu roaming the desert close to Arcosanti. When we tried tolocate it’s owner we found out that the Emu-farm in Cordes Lakes hadgone out of business. Now our new resident emu “Alison” strolls in itsenclosure near the gardens. Emu Alison was selected to be the mascot of theArcosanti 5K Fun Run on June 22, 2002. [photo & text: Ray Lam] A flock of chickensin the garden provide fresh eggs daily. Stella, the white duck came tous from Cosanti after a dramatic coyote attack on herrelatives. [RL] Peacocks roam freelyaround camp providing stunning visual excitement and strange honkingcalls. [RL]last_img

Chellomedia the content arm of Liberty Global ha

first_imgChellomedia, the content arm of Liberty Global, has acquired a 150 hour package of programmes from BBC Worldwide for its Film Mania and Film Café pay TV channels in central Europe.
The deal includes drama series Death in Paradise, which will have its regional debut on the Chello’s channels in Hungary and Romania. Other drama titles include Minnie Driver series The Deep and period dramas Jane Eyre, Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility.Several music programmes are also covered by the deal including live concerts from Beyoncé, Britney Spears and Take That.Levente Málnay, CEO Chello Central Europe said: “It is a great pleasure to expand the already existing BBC Worldwide content on our children’s and entertainment channels with exclusive additions to our film portfolio. This new content package will strengthen the market position of our two film channels, and enrich our film library.”last_img read more

Sam Toles Vimeo has launched a new transactional T

first_imgSam TolesVimeo has launched a new transactional TV store, with Lionsgate and Starz the first partners to come on board to provide content to the service.Vimeo TV Store launched at MIPCOM yesterday and the service is designed to let premium studios sell their shows on a pay-per view basis to viewers in more than 150 countries around the world.Lionsgate is the first major Hollywood studio to provide content to the new venture, making virtually its entire TV catalogue available, including popular series like Orange is the New Black, The Royals, Mad Men and Weeds.Starz will add its content in the coming weeks and will sell shows such as The Girlfriend Experience, Ash vs Evil Dead and Black Sails through the store.Speaking to DTVE ahead of the launch, Vimeo vice-president of programming, Sam Toles, described Vimeo TV Store as “the first global television on-demand service.“The real differentiator is, if you look at iTunes or Google, they do offer feature films on a worldwide basis, but television is limited to a handful of territories – between six and seven depending on the various players,” said Toles.“We felt there was a real opportunity to open up television in a global window so that when shows are launched, they can be released transactionally next day from air in 150-plus territories and really give the world access to premium content. We’re opening that ecosystem now to studios and reverse engineering from the ground up.”Toles said that, with the store, Vimeo is creating new windows and new ways for studios to monetise their content. He added that there will be “a number of other announcements over the coming months with additional providers of that level of quality joining the initiative”.Starz chief operating officer, Jeffrey Hirsch, said: “Vimeo is undoubtedly one of the most cutting-edge online video platforms and Starz is very pleased to join Lionsgate in agreeing to provide content to Vimeo’s storefront.“With this agreement, Starz will make available for purchase three of its most powerful and compelling Starz Original series for consumers around the world.”last_img read more

In 2005 Francis Brauner was a quarter of the way

first_imgIn 2005, Francis Brauner was a quarter of the way through a 20-year prison sentence at Dixon Correctional Institute in Louisiana, when he had an accident.Brauner was imprisoned for a rape conviction, which he maintains was wrongful and part of a setup by a corrupt judge.His sentence involved hard labor, and one day he was out in the fields, cutting the grass and he bent over to pick something up from the ground. He felt a sharp pain in his back.”There’s no words to describe how bad the pain was, really,” he says. A few days later, it got worse. “It felt like I was hit by a bolt of lightning or something, I mean the pain just shot from my head to my toes.”Years before, he’d been in a car accident, so it was not the first time he had had back trouble. But this time, he could barely stand up.Prison authorities rushed him to Charity Hospital in New Orleans, but then Hurricane Katrina struck. In the chaos, Brauner found himself re-routed to Louisiana State Penitentiary, better known as Angola prison. There he was told he’d find a larger facility with better resources to treat inmates needing medical attention. But he says he was denied the surgery that might have helped.Instead, when he arrived he was left in a bed for a month, largely unattended. He developed wounds on his backside that became so infected, they nearly killed him.”My wounds got severe,” says Brauner, showing a photo of a large, circular gash on his backside. “It actually ate all of my muscle tissue and left gaping open wounds.”Brauner became paralyzed from the waist down and was stationed in the hospital ward of Angola prison.Lapses in careAngola prison is the largest maximum security prison in the country. There are over 6,000 men incarcerated there, most of them serving life sentences.The prison is more than 130 miles from New Orleans. Because of its remote location, most of the medical needs of the inmates are met by a small team of doctors, nurses and EMTs who also live on the grounds.Brauner started to notice that the medical staff were careless about their treatment. He decided to keep a journal to record what he perceived as lapses in medical care.”I started documenting,” Brauner says. “Everything that they did, that they said, day by day. I documented every day.” If a nurse gave out the wrong medication, he wrote that down. If a doctor failed to order a biopsy, he entered it in his journal.That documentation was shared with Nick Trenticosta, a lawyer who represents death penalty cases and was visiting Brauner for an unrelated case. Even though Trenticosta has been going to the prison practically every month for the past three decades, he didn’t recall ever seeing the hospital ward before. He was shocked.”There were open garbage containers,” Trenticosta recounted. “Fly tape hanging from the ceiling with a lot of dead flies on it. Over men’s beds who had open bedsores.”Taking legal actionSince then, the number of complaints about the medical care has increased. Then in 2015, a lawsuit was filed, Lewis v. Cain, accusing Angola prison of causing “needless pain and suffering.” Late last month, Judge Shelly Dick said the case could proceed as a class action lawsuit on behalf of Angola’s prisoners.After repeated requests, the prison’s lawyers would not comment. So to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside, we contacted former employees like Sandy Netherland-Roberts, a paramedic at Angola prison who later ran the hospice.”Budgetary wise, medical-wise, the place gives awesome care,” Netherland-Roberts says. “Do I feel that there is a better health care there than some people get in the outside world? One hundred percent.”According to Dr. Tobe Momah, who worked there for a year, many challenges stem from how long the men stay at Angola.”They’re going to be there for 40, 50 years, so they’re going to develop cancer, hypertension, diabetes…” Momah says. “So every time they have a need that is outside the scope of us five doctors, they have to leave the site.”Leaving the site is prohibitively expensive. And it’s costing the prison even more since Louisiana overhauled its safety net hospital system. Momah says under the circumstances, the medical staff was doing their best to care for the prison’s 6,000-plus inmates.”Well, I don’t know what he means by ‘the circumstances,’ ” says Nick Trenticosta, the lawyer, of Momah’s assessment. “If ‘the circumstances’ means, ‘We don’t have proper medication. We don’t have proper equipment. But we do the best we can,’ It’s like talking like a MASH unit. You know?”Prisoners are the only group in the United States who have a constitutional right to health care. At the core of this lawsuit is the question of what quality of health care prisoners deserve. To Dr. Momah, that is not up for debate.”The first law of medicine is, serve humanity irrespective of who they are,” says Dr. Momah. “So no doctor, as far as I know, will diminish care based on a person’s crime.”As resources have dried up, however, the prison is struggling to provide even basic care. The lawsuit demands more oversight, reforms and a bigger budget for medical care.As for Francis Brauner, he says that most of the men he was with on the chronic care ward at Angola prison have passed away. He was lucky.”I mean… I’m not sentenced to death and that’s the bottom line,” Brauner says. “I’m not sentenced to death.”Since finishing his sentence in 2015, Brauner has been living at a medical facility not far from the prison, waiting for surgery to help heal his wounds.This story was produced in collaboration with In These Times, and Katie Rose Quandt’s reporting was made possible by a grant from the Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting. Copyright 2018 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.last_img read more

A worldrenowned solo percussionist a mental heal

first_imgA world-renowned solo percussionist, a mental health campaigner, a digital inclusion expert and the founder of a travel review website are among the disabled people recognised in the new year honours list.The honours for non-sporting disabled recipients were swamped by nearly 60 awards for the ParalympicsGB team that brought back 64 gold medals from last summer’s Rio Paralympic Games.But the highest-ranking honour was awarded to Dame Evelyn Glennie, the solo percussionist who was made a Companion of Honour, for those who have made a lengthy and major contribution to the arts, science, medicine, or government.She said she felt “deeply honoured and humbled” to receive the award, for services to music.Dame Evelyn, who is profoundly Deaf, was the first person to successfully sustain a full-time career as a solo percussionist, and so far has amassed more than 80 international awards, including two GRAMMYs from the US music industry.Past Companion of Honour recipients include the writers Vita Sackville-West, Graham Greene, and E M Forster, composer Benjamin Britten, the actors Sir John Gielgud, Dame Judi Dench and Dame Maggie Smith, politicians Denis Healey, Ken Clarke and Paddy Ashdown, and the disabled physicist Stephen Hawking.Dame Evelyn (pictured) said: “I count myself blessed to be amongst such an eminent list of recipients for such a distinguished award.“As a musician, I am proud to represent the arts in this way. I also hold dear the responsibility of such a respected title, which I take very seriously.“I will do my best to ensure my work and legacy continues to help empower people around the world to truly listen.”She told Disability News Service (DNS) that the award would not change how she viewed her work, and that her “aims and goals remain as stalwart as ever, with clear determination to reach far and wide”.Dame Evelyn said the award would not make her part of the establishment, but instead would have the “complete opposite” effect.She said: “The freedom and creativity has always been at the heart of what I do, no matter what comes my way or what challenges arise.“I respect the establishment, as it opens up unexpected possibilities and new avenues of exploration.”Another recipient of an award is mental health campaigner Jonny Benjamin, best-known for his successful social media quest to find the stranger who convinced him not to end his own life.Benjamin, who receives an MBE, said he was “in complete shock”, but was “delighted” to be recognised.He told DNS that he had considered rejecting the honour in protest at the government’s welfare reforms and cuts to disability benefits.He has spoken out publicly about disabled people whose lives have been lost as a result of those reforms, and against the cuts of £30-a-week to new claimants of employment and support allowance placed in the work-related activity group, cuts that are due to take effect in April.He said he thought the MBE might help him access contacts in the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Education for campaigns he is planning around the need for reform of mental health support in schools and prisons.He said that 90 per cent of prisoners have a mental health issue, while suicides in prisons were the highest ever recorded last year.He said: “There’s a suicide every three days in prisons in England and Wales now.“We’ve got a crisis in our prisons that needs urgent attention.”He added: “I hoped, perhaps naively, that the MBE might bring more credibility to my name when trying to set up meetings and make a difference. Perhaps I’m wrong. Time will tell.”And he said he still had the option of handing back the MBE if he was proved wrong.He had earlier paid tribute to Neil Laybourn, the man who persuaded him not to take his life nine years ago, and who he said he feels “forever indebted to”.He said: “I hope this accolade may give some hope to others who might be struggling that there is life after a diagnosis of mental illness and that such a diagnosis should never put limitations upon anyone.”Robin Christopherson, a founding member of the disability charity AbilityNet, is awarded an MBE for services to digital inclusion.He said: “I’m hoping that receiving this award might help get the message out and inspire people to think about the needs of everyone around them and make sure they can all benefit from the power of technology and the internet to change their lives for the better.”Christopherson, who is blind, won the special award at AbilityNet’s Tech4Good awards last July, in recognition of his two decades of work as a “digital inclusion evangelist”.He said: “I’ve had the privilege to be AbilityNet’s ambassador for technology for many years, giving me the opportunity to demonstrate to audiences across the world how tech has the power to change and even transform people’s lives regardless of any disability or impairment they may have.“AbilityNet’s mission is to help people to reach their full potential. Over the last few decades we’ve seen a revolution that has almost infinitely expanded opportunities for people with disabilities and I feel very fortunate to have played a small part in spreading the word.”Jacqui Dyer, who was vice-chair of the government’s Mental Health Taskforce, and is a trustee of the Mental Health Foundation, an elected councillor in Lambeth, a health and social care consultant, and a mental health service-user, also receives an MBE.Dyer is a member of the ministerial advisory group for mental health, is the mental health equalities lead for NHS England, and co-chairs the process of developing the mayor of London’s mental health roadmap.Michael Holden, who founded the user-led accessible travel website Trip-ability, is recognised with an MBE.He is also an active member of Belfast Centre for Independent Living, a member of the European Network on Independent Living, and deputy chair of a patient working group at the Royal College of GPs Northern Ireland.Holden said: “I received a letter about the MBE but my wife Jennifer told me about it over the phone when I wasn’t at home and I immediately began to tremble with excitement.“My wife and I took our children to see the royal wedding of Prince William in London, which the children really enjoyed; my wife Jennifer and I cannot wait to see the look on their faces when we tell them we’re going to see the Queen.”Sarah Banks, who chairs the Ministry of Defence’s Civilian Defence Disability Network, which works to ensure line managers and disabled staff know where to go for advice on workplace disability issues, receives an MBE.Other disabled recipients of an MBE included Cath Caskie-Khan, chair of the Scottish Wheelchair Dance Association, and Rhona Elliot, founder of the MS Borders Racing Club, which raises money for the MS Society and awareness of multiple sclerosis by entering horses in the charity’s colours in races in the Scottish borders.Among Paralympians recognised were Lee Pearson, who receives a knighthood, Sophie Christiansen and Sascha Kindred, who receive CBEs, and Anne Dunham and Jody Cundy, who receive OBEs, while Tim Reddish, chair of the British Paralympic Association and himself a retired Paralympian, receives a CBE.Another receipient, with an MBE for services to education and disability sport, was Mike Spence, a former GB wheelchair rugby international, who coached the British team at last summer’s Invictus Games in the US, is a trustee of Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby, and is also a teaching assistant and former governor of a primary school in Gloucestershire.Picture: Dame Evelyn Glennie, in the BBC’s Living Shakespeare serieslast_img read more

This Uplifting Tale of a Thrifty Woman Who Amassed a Fortune of

first_img May 8, 2018 Add to Queue 4 min read This Uplifting Tale of a Thrifty Woman Who Amassed a Fortune of Millions Is Also Kind of Discouraging Register Now » Next Article How to Become a Millionaire Entrepreneur Staff Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img –shares Peter Page The transition from wage slave to millionaire is pondered by many but successfully made by very few. One who accomplished it is the late Sylvia Bloom. Shortly before her death in 2016 at age 96 she surprised everyone who knew her by revealing a net worth of roughly $9 million, which she left mostly to scholarship funds.Bloom, the subject of a beautiful New York Times profile prompted by revelation of her $6.24 million bequest to the Henry Street Settlement, amassed her fortune through a combination of hard work, thrift and sensible investing that serves as an example for everyone struggling today for financial security. A little reading between the lines, however, reveals she got some important help along the way which once was available widely but now is not so much.Related: How Student Loans Are Crushing Millennial EntrepreneurialismBloom was born to immigrant parents in Brooklyn generations before it was cool. She grew up during the Great Depression, so everyone traumatized by the Great Recession can appreciate she had a rough start in life. She attended New York City’s public schools, eventually earning her bachelor degree attending New York’s public Hunter College at night while eking out a living working days (Bloom bequeathed $1 million for scholarships to Hunter College). In 1947, Bloom was one of the first support staff hired at the newly-founded Wall Street law firm of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, where she worked for 67 years as it grew to an international firm of 1,200 lawyers. Its “our practice” page lists 64 categories beginning with “Africa” and concluding with “white-collar defense and investigations.”Bloom’s niece, Jane Lockshin, told The New York Times her aunt paid attention to the stocks the Wall Street attorneys she worked for bought. When they bought, she bought (and presumably sold when they sold).Indisputably, she was thrifty. It seems no one ever saw her take a cab of any sort — yellow, Uber or Lyft. The day of the 9/11 attacks she was at work until she evacuated on foot (the Twin Towers were located near the offices of Cleary Gottlieb). She walked across the Brooklyn Bridge and took a bus home to the rent-stabilized apartment she shared for decades with her husband, a firefighter who became a public school teacher and part-time pharmacist in retirement. They had no children.Related: Loss of Net Neutrality Risks a Less Friendly Internet for EntrepreneursThis part of Bloom’s life story fits the uplifting narrative of self-determination: work hard, skimp, save, invest. Those are choices everyone can make for themselves. But many of the wise choices she made are more problematic today. A college degree is still a major asset in the job market worth working hard for, as Bloom did, but she probably graduated owing little or nothing. Today, 44.2 million Americans carry an average student loan burden of $37,000. The average monthly student loan payment for borrowers aged 20 to 30 years is $351.The rent-stabilized apartment in Brooklyn certainly had to have made it easier for Bloom to find money to invest. The median asking rent in New York City is around $2800 per month now. Like lots of young people today, Bloom went to work for a startup. Unlike lots of young people hustling in the gig economy today, she took a full-time job with an employer who provided benefits and a solid employment guarantee. Her husband was assured a pension when he retired from FDNY, unlike people today struggling to fund their own retirements.Related: 6 Regions Where Tech Jobs Boom the Housing Is Scary Expensive“She was a child of the Depression and she knew what it was like not to have money,” her niece said. “She had great empathy for other people who were needy and wanted everybody to have a fair shake.”Sylvia Bloom achieved something remarkable and rare, but you get the sense reading her story that she wasn’t smug about it. You get the feeling she would emphasize with the many thrifty people who, instead of slowly building wealthy, are hustling just to stay afloat. Maybe they can put a couple of bucks away for better times, but rent and loan payments come first. Image credit: Henry Street Settlement You can mimic her hard work and frugality but good luck finding a guaranteed cheap apartment or a college degree without student debt. Senior Editor for Green Entrepreneur Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

Zenefits CEO Resigns Amid Compliance Issues

first_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Zenefits CEO Resigns Amid Compliance Issues Image credit: Zenefits Add to Queue Reuters Apply Now » 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Next Article center_img This story originally appeared on Reuters Zenefits Zenefits, a software startup valued at $4.5 billion, said on Monday it had replaced founder and Chief Executive Parker Conrad and appointed a new leader for the troubled tech company.David Sacks, a former executive at Yammer and PayPal who joined Zenefits a year ago as chief operating officer, has taken over as CEO.”The fact is that many of our internal processes, controls, and actions around compliance have been inadequate, and some decisions have just been plain wrong,” Sacks said in a letter to employees. “As a result, Parker has resigned.”Zenefits provides software for businesses to automate aspects of their human resources services, including healthcare benefits, stock options, maternity leave and vacation time.Once considered by venture capitalists as the fastest-growing software startup, Zenefits has come under fire for allegedly flouting insurance laws and failing to deliver on promises to customers. It is the latest example of a unicorn — a venture-backed tech firm worth $1 billion or more — whose business appears far less sound than investors believed it to be.Recently, Zenefits came under investigation in Washington state for allegations it let unlicensed brokers sell health coverage. Media site BuzzFeed reported, following an investigation of the company, that it allowed salespeople without licenses to act as insurance brokers in at least seven states.San Francisco-based Zenefits said on Monday it appointed its first chief compliance officer, who is in charge of ensuring that the company complies with regulations and broker licensing requirements.”Our culture and tone have been inappropriate for a highly regulated company,” Sacks said.In a statement released by Zenefits, Conrad said he was proud of the company “but recognize that our company’s management infrastructure and policies haven’t kept pace with our meteoric growth.”Reuters could not immediately reach Conrad for comment.The company also said Peter Thiel, co-founder of PayPal and a high-profile Silicon Valley investor, would join the board.Zenefits launched as a high-tech health insurance broker, working as the middleman between businesses and healthcare providers such as Anthem Blue Cross, making money off the commission or broker fee. That sparked a turf war with traditional brokers across the country.It also waged battles with insurance regulators who argued that Zenefits could not give its free software to businesses while also serving as their insurance broker.Conrad, a survivor of testicular cancer and advocate for healthcare reform, founded the company in 2013. He raised more than $500 million from investors, including two rounds of financing from venture firm Andreessen Horowitz within four months.At one point, the company was growing 30 percent month-over-month, and it hired thousands of employees and opened offices in Arizona in 2014 and 2015.(Reporting by Heather Somerville; Editing by Peter Cooney) February 9, 2016 –shares 3 min readlast_img read more

Connected TV is Transforming the Digital Advertising Ecosystem Extreme Reachs Latest Video

first_imgImpact of CTV’s Surging Popularity Includes Highest-Ever Completion Rate and Longer Ad LengthWith impressions increasing nearly 60 percent year over year, connected TV (CTV) advertising now accounts for nearly half of impressions served, reveals the latest Video Benchmark Report from Extreme Reach (ER), the complete creative asset management solution for the ad industry. Based on Q1 2019 performance metrics from the company’s platform, AdBridge, and specifically its proprietary video ad server, the report highlights the massive impact of CTV on multiple aspects of digital advertising.The CTV-driven transformation is accelerating in parallel with consumers’ shifting media consumption preferences. According to a report issued by Nielsen in March 2019, 68 percent of U.S. households had a connected TV device (e.g., Roku, Apple TV) by Q3 2018. At the same time, use of ad-supported streaming services like Hulu and a host of emerging entrants in the field is surging. And where the audience goes, ad dollars soon follow. While OTT advertising budgets are currently just 3 percent of TV ad budgets, Magna Global predicts a 30-plus percent growth rate for both 2019 and 2020.CTV’s Gain is Mobile’s LossWhile the advertising conversation in Q1 2018 revolved around mobile and there was optimism about the adoption of 6-second video ads, Q1 2019 reflects a near-opposite paradigm. Mobile video ads, at just 25 percent of all impressions, are at their lowest since Q1 2017 and 6-second ad impressions are negligible.CTV impressions, on the other hand, are now 49 percent of the total, or nearly double those of mobile. Because these ads are generally unskippable, they have an unprecedented 97 percent completion rate.Marketing Technology News: Selligent Marketing Cloud Study Reveal Digital Marketers Struggle to Deliver Consistent Omnichannel ExperiencesThe Rise of One- and Two-Minute Ads As noted in prior benchmark reports, the growth of CTV and its unskippable ad inventory is driving a shift to longer ad lengths. In Q4 2018, 30-second ads first displaced 15-second spots as the most common ad length, and the growth trend has continued. 30-second ads accounted for 69 percent of all ads in Q1 2019, a 20 percent increase over the prior quarter.While 30-second spots have a clear majority and 15-seconds are in second place, ER projects that ads of 60-seconds and longer will become more prevalent in the coming quarters. Still just 3 percent of all ads, the quantity of 60-second ads increased nearly 5-fold from Q1 2018 to Q1 2019. 2-minute ads registered for the first time on the ER Benchmark radar in Q1 2019 at just 0.1 percent of ads. With a growing, captive CTV audience, ER expects these longer ads to rise rapidly.Marketing Technology News: Aprimo Recognized as Winner for 2019 Microsoft Media & Communications Partner of the YearPremium Publishers Lead The rise of CTV has reached critical mass for the sell side of the media-buying equation who can now capitalize on multi-channel content consumption and optimize the value of their highly-targeted, measurable audiences. CTV inventory is almost exclusively sold by premium publishers directly to agencies and advertisers and this has driven up the percentage of overall impressions served to premium publishers, along with video completion rates and an increase in longer ads as noted above. In Q1, 82 percent of video impressions served by Extreme Reach ran on premium publisher sites and the video completion rates for those publishers hit a record high of 93 percent, a year over year increase of 8 percent from Q1 2018.“The digital advertising ecosystem is undergoing a total disruption which is driven by the growth of non-linear TV formats. The upside is significant for nearly everyone,” stated Mary Vestewig, Senior Director, Video Account Management at Extreme Reach. “Publishers are able to maximize the value of their inventory which will bring the revenue needed to create more high-quality programming. Meanwhile, audiences have an unprecedented selection of entertainment options and with new capabilities for targeting they should get more personalized and relevant advertising.”This report marks the addition of six new benchmarks for ER. Metrics for the In-View Start Rate, In-View Completion Rate, Audible Start Rate, Audible Completion Rate, Average Duration In-View and Average Duration Audible are now included. The data sheds light on how much of the actual ad can be seen or heard both when the ad starts and when it stops playing as well as the total duration, in seconds. Further insights on these trends will be provided in the Q2 2019 Benchmarks Report.Marketing Technology News: Say It Now and Booxscale win Amazon’s European Alexa Cup Connected TV is Transforming the Digital Advertising Ecosystem: Extreme Reach’s Latest Video Benchmarks Report Shows 49% of Video Ad Impressions Going to CTV MTS Staff WriterJuly 2, 2019, 11:28 amJuly 2, 2019 AdBridgeasset management solutionConnected TVMarketing TechnologyNewsVideo Benchmark Report Previous ArticleDigital Technology, Automation and Sourcing for Contact Centers the Focus of ISG Smartalks WebinarNext Article93% of Teens Are Relieved to Escape Social Media at Overnight Summer Camp, Finds Survey by Screen Education and JCC Association of North Americalast_img read more

5G service rolls out—but not without controversy

first_img Citation: 5G service rolls out—but not without controversy (2018, October 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-5g-outbut-controversy.html The United States Conference of Mayors called the ruling “an unprecedented federal intrusion into local (and state) government property rights that will have substantial and continuing adverse impacts on cities and their taxpayers, including reduced funding for essential local government services, and needlessly introduce increased risk of right of way and other public safety hazards.”On Tuesday, Seattle announced plans to appeal the decision in federal court.”This is more than just an unfunded mandate, requiring us to do something without paying for the cost,” said Seattle city attorney Pete Holmes. “This is more like a taking, frankly, without due process and without compensation. Cities have property rights, and that has really just been thrown out with this ruling.”He called the deal “a gift to the industry” that will “deny us a return on our assets that we enjoy today.”Fees and processes vary widely from place to place, and are often used to fund other city services. Holmes said that companies in Seattle can pay up to $1,800 per pole as an annual fee; prices go up to $5,100 for prime Manhattan locations and down to $148 in neighborhoods where the city wants to incentivize more deployment, according to Bloomberg.In Los Angeles, the city said that the break-even point for small cell facilities is $800 per installation. But in exchange for amenities such as free Wi-Fi in Skid Row and at recreation centers, $400,000 of scholarship money, and launching an innovation center in the city, L.A. is charging Verizon just $175 per device per year for 10 years for up to 1,000 installations, plus the cost of electricity.Jeanne Holm, L.A.’s deputy chief information officer, said the city cut a good deal: “Verizon brought a bunch of stuff to the table which, in my opinion, is well worth that offset, and our financial analysts have also agreed.”The details of the city’s deal with Verizon are currently in front of the City Council for approval, as are preliminary plans for a mobile 5G deal with AT&T.Although the city’s fee for Verizon is below the maximum set by the FCC, the new rules could give the carrier a chance to renegotiate on terms it considers more favorable.Jonathan LeCompte, president of Verizon’s Pacific market, said he couldn’t speak on the specifics of the Los Angeles deal without the financials in front of him, but said “if it’s a little bigger delta between the numbers, there might be a different plan of attack.”In a letter to the FCC, Mayor Eric Garcetti urged the commission to rewrite the ruling before its adoption, arguing that the decision would “insert confusion into the market, and sow mistrust between my technology team and the carriers with whom we have already reached agreements.”The L.A. city attorney’s office did not respond to requests for comment.Small cell 5G technology relies on higher-frequency radio waves than current wireless services to deliver faster speeds—but at shorter ranges. Those higher-frequency signals, which measure in millimeters, can be obstructed by objects of a similar size, such as leaves and raindrops.Twenty U.S. states have enacted legislation that streamlines regulation on 5G small cell installation, and a California bill that would have reduced local power to block new installations was vetoed by Gov. Jerry Brown late last year.The FCC says the new rule will save money for telecommunications companies, which will redirect those funds to deploy 5G service to less-connected rural areas.Industry experts dispute this hypothesis—and leading telecoms say rural areas are not their first priority for 5G service.”No one believes that’s going to happen,” said Levin, the former FCC official. “Inside the Beltway, they say if they save them a buck in New York they’ll go deploy in Montana. That’s not just dumb, that’s a special kind of stupid.”The FCC did not respond to a Times request for comment.Scott Mair, AT&T’s president of operations, said “small cell technology will start initially for mobile networks in dense urban areas and suburban areas.””Rural America will have 5G over time,” he said.LeCompte, of Verizon, said that rural markets are not a part of the company’s initial rollout plan, but added that “obviously, we need to care for those.”LeCompte praised the permitting process in Los Angeles and Sacramento, but said “in general the permitting process and the flow of paperwork is a long pole in the tent on deploying 5G.”The deal between Verizon and Los Angeles has allowed the city to focus on infrastructure in underserved neighborhoods with low broadband access.”For the initial rollout, we agreed that the downtown area made a lot of sense—partly because we knew the convention center would be an early hub, and wanted to reach out to areas like Pico-Union and others that are underserved around USC,” Holm said.She estimated that it would take 8,000 to 10,000 small cells to fully cover the city. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Lampposts around downtown Los Angeles are being wired with fiber optic cable and shoebox-sized gadgets to beam the fifth and fastest generation of cellular data, known as 5G, into homes and mobile devices. City of Seattle fighting federal government’s new 5G rulescenter_img This high-tech infrastructure build-out is the result of a deal between the city and Verizon—Los Angeles gave the wireless carrier a break on the fees for taking up space on streetlights in exchange for a package of amenities and services.Such arrangements are common nationwide, where local governments have long leveraged access to public property and rights of way as a bargaining chip to accomplish policy goals.But late last month, the Federal Communications Commission took the unusual step of nationalizing public infrastructure for 5G installation, throwing L.A.’s deal with Verizon and agreements between other cities and carriers into question in the process.The FCC established a maximum price that local governments can charge telecom companies for small cell installations on public poles and in city streets: $270. The agency also established what it called a “shot clock” mandating that permits for small cell infrastructure be processed within 60 to 90 days, depending on the type of installation. If the permits take longer, the telecom companies can take cities to court.Cities charging more than the maximum rate of $270 are open to litigation, and according to the ruling will have to prove that the higher fee is a reasonable approximation of costs.”There has never been a federal decision to price-regulate the way local governments provide access to their own property,” said Blair Levin, a fellow at the Brookings Institution who served as chief of staff to the Clinton-era chairman of the FCC. “That’s an extreme step.”FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said the ruling will hasten the rollout of the new technology, which debuted in the homes of some Verizon customers in Los Angeles this week. “Big-city taxes on 5G slow down deployment there and also jeopardize the construction of 5G networks in suburbs and rural America,” he wrote in a statement accompanying the ruling.Local governments across the country, however, say the rules are too friendly to the telecom industry. ©2018 Los Angeles Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Explore furtherlast_img read more

A look inside neural networks

first_img Today it’s almost impossible to find an area in which artificial intelligence is irrelevant, whether in manufacturing, advertising or communications. Many companies use learning and networked AI systems, for example to generate precise demand forecasts and to exactly predict customer behavior. This approach can also be used to adjust regional logistics processes. Healthcare also uses specific AI activities, such as prognosis generation on the basis of structured data. This plays a role for example in image recognition: X-ray images are input into an AI system which then outputs a diagnosis. Proper detection of image content is also crucial to autonomous driving, where traffic signs, trees, pedestrians and cyclists have to be identified with complete accuracy. And this is the crux of the matter: AI systems have to provide absolutely reliable problem-solving strategies in sensitive application areas such as medicinal diagnostics and in security-critical areas. However, in the past is hasn’t been entirely clear how AI systems make decisions. Furthermore, the predictions depend on the quality of the input data. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, HHI and Technische Universität Berlin have now developed a technology, Layer-wise Relevance Propagation (LRP), which renders the AI forecasts explainable and in doing so reveals unreliable problem solution strategies. A further development of LRP technology, referred to as Spectral Relevance Analysis (SpRAy), identifies and quantifies a broad spectrum of learned decision-making behaviors and thus identifies undesirable decisions even in enormous datasets.Transparent AI Citation: A look inside neural networks (2019, July 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-neural-networks.html In practice the technology identifies the individual input elements which have been used to make a prediction. Thus for example when an image of a tissue sample is input into an AI system, the influence of each individual pixel is quantified in the classification results. In other words, as well as predicting how “malignant” or “benign” the imaged tissue is, the system also provides information on the basis for this classification. “Not only is the result supposed to be correct, the solution strategy is as well. In the past, AI systems have been treated as black boxes. The systems were trusted to do the right things. With our open-source software, which uses Layer-Wise Relevance Propagation, we’ve succeeded in rendering the solution-finding process of AI systems transparent,” says Dr. Wojciech Samek, head of the “Machine Learning” research group at Fraunhofer HHI. “We’re using LRP to visualize and interpret neural networks and other machine learning models. We use LRP to measure the influence of every input variable in the overall prediction and parse the decisions made by the classifiers,” adds Dr. Klaus-Rob-ert Müller, Professor for Machine Learning at TU Berlin. Clarifying how artificial intelligence systems make choices Unreliable solution strategiesTrusting the results of neural networks necessarily means understanding how they work. According to the research team’s tests, AI systems don’t always apply the best strategies to reach a solution. For example, one well-known AI system classifies images based on context. It allocated photographs to the category “Ship’ when a large amount of water was visible in the picture. It wasn’t solving the actual task of recognizing images of ships, even if in the majority of cases it picked out the right photos. “Many AI algorithms use unreliable strategies and arrive at highly impractical solutions,” says Samek, summarizing the results of the investigations. Explore further More information: Sebastian Lapuschkin et al. Unmasking Clever Hans predictors and assessing what machines really learn, Nature Communications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08987-4 Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Artificial intelligence (AI) is already firmly embedded in our everyday lives and is conquering more and more territory. For example, voice assistants are already an everyday item in many people’s smartphones, cars and homes. Progress in the field of AI is based primarily on the use of neural networks. Mimicking the functionality of the human brain, neural networks link mathematically defined units with one another. But in the past it was not known just how a neural network makes decisions. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, HHI and Technische Universität Berlin have developed a technology that reveals the criteria AI systems use when making decisions. The innovative Spectral Relevance Analysis (SpRAy) method based on Layer-wise Relevance Propagation technology provides a first peek inside the “black box.” AI, machine learning and moreArtificial intelligence is concerned with the development of systems that can independently solve problems and act analogously to patterns of human thought and behavior. At present the greatest progress is being made in the area of machine learning, a subfield of AI. Machine learning deals with methods of extracting knowledge from data and independently learning contexts contained in the data. The progress is a result of using artificial neural networks based on connections between mathematical calculation units that in principle imitate the neural structure of the human brain. A subfield of machine learning, deep learning, covers a class of new procedures that make it possible to teach and train complex artificial neural networks. These networks consist of a large number of levels which are linked with one another in many-layered structures. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Here the AI system allocates the image to the correct category based on the copyright banner. Nevertheless, the solution strategy is defective. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Layer-wise Relevance Propagation provides a look inside the “black box.” Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Journal information: Nature Communications Here the AI system classifies an image as a train because tracks are present. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI The new Spectral-wise Relevance Analysis technology renders visible the criteria used by AI systems when making decisions. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Watching neural networks thinkThe LRP technology decodes the functionality of neural networks and finds out which characteristic features are used, for example to identify a horse as a horse and not as a donkey or a cow. It identifies the information flowing through the system at each node of the network. This makes it possible to investigate even very deep neural networks.The Fraunhofer HHI and TU Berlin research teams are currently formulating new algorithms for the investigation of further questions in order to make AI systems even more reliable and robust. The project partners have published their research results in the journal Nature Communications.last_img read more

Dont Be Confused If This Starfish Makes Your Mouth Water

first_img In Photos: The Stunning Sea Life ‘Stars’ of ‘Big Pacific’ If this starfish is making your mouth water, you’re not alone. When a photo of Plinthaster dentatus went viral on Twitter last week, pasta-lovers did a double take — the sea star looked just like a piece of ravioli. Originally published on Live Science. In Photos: The Wonders of the Deep Seacenter_img Marine Marvels: Spectacular Photos of Sea Creatures starfish out here lookin like a snack https://t.co/H7BPqTWsDwby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndohear.comThese German hearing aids are going viralhear.comUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndo — XD (@radfag_) July 11, 2019 Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65934-ravioli-sea-star.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35 The photo of the starfish, captured on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s recent expedition to the deep Atlantic Ocean, propelled the tasty looking echinoderm to fame. But until now, the “ravioli” star (also called the cookie star) was a bit of a nobody. Even though scientists have known of the ravioli star for some time, only recently did the creature get a common (non-Latin) name, Christopher Mah, an invertebrate biologist at the Smithsonian Museum at Natural History, told Live Science. Instead, the starfish was known only by its formal scientific name, P. dentatus. [Photos: See the World’s Cutest Sea Creatures] That’s because until now, people rarely had the chance to observe the starfish in its natural habitat. Most of what scientists know about the ravioli star comes from specimens that were already dead, Mah said. Now, with the advent of remotely operated vehicles like NOAA’s Deep Discoverer, which captured rare footage of ravioli stars, everyone has virtual access to these creatures. It was sometime in the last year that Mah began hearing the names “cookie star” and “ravioli star” bouncing around the internet. “It’s just kind of amusing to me,” Mah said, “[The name] just took off so quickly.” The starfish isn’t new or unusual — it has existed at the depths of the ocean for much longer than its moniker. But the way Twitter is interacting with the ravioli star and other marine wonders is completely novel, Mah said. Just the fact that the internet has bred a new name for these creatures is evidence of a new kind of citizen science, he added. That’s a good thing. “Any kind of connection that I think the public has with natural history, with nature is important,” Mah said. As for the ravioli star, its moment in the spotlight is only just beginning. This is an exciting moment for deep-sea creatures like the pasta doppelganger, Mah said. For the first time, scientists have the chance to study how they interact with their environment — what they eat, how they reproduce and how they navigate their underwater world. On the Deep Discoverer’s most recent dive, for instance, the ROV captured another image of a group of ravioli stars ganging up on a sea sponge (a sea creature with no skeleton and a soft, porous body). Until now, scientists knew virtually nothing about this sea star’s biology. This is the Deep Discoverers seventh dive on an expedition called Windows to the Deep.last_img read more