‘A Long Time Coming’: Black Women Celebrate Harris’s Ascension

first_img“I’m very proud to be a Black woman, very proud to witness this important time in history given the huge divide that we have in our nation right now,” she said. Ms. Hunter added that she was “encouraged that we can continue to have our little Black girls and other girls of color feel encouraged like they can do whatever they want to do and they can be whatever they want to be.” In Atlanta on Saturday, a celebration was underway on Auburn Avenue, the traditional and spiritual heart of the city’s African-American community. It sits beneath a towering mural of John Lewis, the pioneering civil rights leader who represented Congress for 33 years before his death in July. Some rode up on bicycles and toasted glasses of champagne. Others broke into song.- Advertisement – Rick Rojas and Richard Fausset reported from Atlanta, Audra D. S. Burch from Wilton Manors, Fla., and Evan Nicole Brown from Los Angeles. “It’s opened so many doors for so many little girls who feel like they have been silenced or told they couldn’t be who they are,” said Nikema Williams, who has been elected to succeed Mr. Lewis, as she stood in a parking lot below the mural. “So as a Black woman in politics, this means the world.”Of Mr. Lewis, Ms. Williams said: “I know that he is somewhere doing a happy dance.”Ms. Harris, like Ms. Williams, is also a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. Soon, two dozen other sorority members formed a circle under the mural and burst into one of their sorority’s signature songs:- Advertisement – Hearts that are loyalAnd hearts that are trueBy merit and cultureWe strive and we doThings that are worthwhile …Charisma Deberry, a spokeswoman for the Omega Omicron Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, in San Diego, said Ms. Harris’s victory “validates the American dream for me.” “Throughout my life, I’ve always been teased for being ‘bossy,’ assertive and ‘talking white,” Ms. Deberry said, “because I had big goals and vision for my life. Today, I am proud to be a bossy Black woman. Just like the vice president of the United States, Senator Kamala Harris.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Paisley Park needs to improve to regain crown | Racing News

first_imgEmma Lavelle accepts Paisely Park may need to progress again if he is to regain his Stayers’ Hurdle crown at the Cheltenham Festival.The eight-year-old suffered a shock defeat in the Grade One feature back in March – coming home a well-beaten seventh behind Lisnagar Oscar, having triumphed in his two prep runs for the main event.- Advertisement – “He came in with a beaming smile after that (gallop), because he was bulling for more as they crossed the line. Coming here was not about seeing how fast he could go up the home straight, it was about lengthening. He lengthened for five furlongs.“Both horses came out of it full of confidence. They’ve had a nice blow, and it would have brought him forward and hopefully put him spot on for a week on Friday.”Lavelle has no plans to go over fences with Paisley Park in the future, but admits he will need to raise his game again if he is to remain among the top rank in the staying hurdle division.- Advertisement – She added: “I’d say he will be a hurdler for the rest of his career. He is a great jumper of a hurdle now, but he took a long time to be a good jumper of a hurdle. I don’t know if he is manly enough to tackle fences. If we can win the races we have been winning, why take that risk?“Every year you look at the new horses coming up that are going to have a crack at that division, and we were one of them. I’d never take any of these horses for granted, but I sometimes think once you have been there and done it, there has been a history of those kind of horses remaining at the top for a while in this division, and we are hoping that he is one of them.“He probably will have to step forward again, but he is only eight. I think naturally he should still be getting better, if everything operates in the way that it should.” – Advertisement – It later transpired Paisley Park had suffered an irregular heartbeat at the Festival. But after he worked with stablemate Hoi Polloi at Newbury as part of Tuesday’s Ladbrokes Winter Carnival gallops morning, Lavelle believes he is primed for his return in the Long Distance Hurdle back at the Berkshire track on November 27 – a race he won first time out last term.Lavelle said: “He has been absolutely brilliant. Barry (Fenton) rides him all the time and he knows him inside out.“All the way through this season, he has been happier with him. He has just felt really sparky and well in himself. He is just much more up for it and he hasn’t had to ask him any questions.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Charged exchange: PLN electricity billing confusion enters third month

first_imgIn a statement released on July 3, PLN acknowledged that the anomalies were a result of their new billing method.The new method calculates monthly residential power bills based on consumption during the previous three months. For example, higher-than-usual energy consumption in April and May was billed in June.“Very likely, these are leftover installments from unpaid bills the previous month,” said PLN spokesman Agung Murdifi in a statement on July 3. “PLN will investigate the cases further,” he added.In June, 4.3 million post-paid residential customers saw bills 20 percent higher than in the previous month. PLN attributed this to higher electricity consumption as people stayed at home. PLN then relaxed its billing policy for 1.93 million consumers who experienced a spike in their June bills. It charged 40 percent of the June bill in that month and opted to charge the remaining 60 percent over the next three months on top of the subsequent months’ power bills.Read also: Consumers lament PLN electricity bill spikeYan Kardian’s screenshot of his bills shows that the bill from the previous month had been relaxed and that one third of the remaining sum was charged in the July bill.However, PLN charged Yan more than 70 percent of his June bill in June, higher than PLN’s promised 40 percent under the relaxation scheme, the screenshot shows.PLN executives, government officials and the Indonesian Consumers Foundation (YLKI) have repeatedly refuted netizens’ claims that the high bills were because PLN had secretly raised electricity tariffs.“Consumers felt they were being cheated with a higher rate. There is no higher rate,” said YLKI chairman Tulus Abadi in a video statement on June 7.Topics : Indonesian households have seen abnormal electricity bills for the third consecutive month, likely a result of the accumulation of monthly charges in state electricity firm PLN’s new payment scheme.Yan Kardian, an employee at a private company, reported on July 2 that his electricity bill rose 15 percent month-on-month to Rp 370,259 ($25.55) in July even though his consumption fell 20 percent to 242 kilowatt hours (KwH) over the same time period, according to a screenshot he posted on Twitter.“How can consumption be so little yet the bill go up?” he wrote on his Twitter account @yankpoesh on July 2.last_img read more

Para Los Niños executive named Senior Fellow

first_imgThe Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab housed in the Marshall School of Business recently named Martine Singer, president and CEO of Para Los Niños, a senior fellow. Singer will work with students in the lab as a mentor and career resource.The BSEL, established in 2008, works with Marshall students to address social issues with business practices. Singer’s background with PLN, a nonprofit dedicated to academic access and opportunities for children living in poverty in the Los Angeles area, provides expertise in the field.“The Los Angeles Times ran an editorial about children playing on skid row in broken glass and feces-filled areas,” said Patrick Sinclair, vice president of development and Communications for PLN. “A social worker and an actress read that article and decided to do something about it.”Founded in 1980, PLN worked to bring various facilities, including eight charter preschools and social work facilities to the metro area — all serving the purpose of helping low-income children receive an education.Singer has worked with PLN since 2012, but has a diverse and unique background. Her work at Hollygrove, an L.A. nonprofit dedicated to helping at-risk children and their families, oversaw a transformation from primarily community-based services to a merger with a statewide organization.“I began as a tutor and eventually got to know the woman who was running the organization and found that I had skills that would be helpful from my experience doing consulting,” Singer said.Singer did not always work for the nonprofit sector. With an M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management, as well as past work with The New York Times and the L.A. Times, she perfected the art of utilizing skills from one sector in another.“The expectation [at the Yale School of Management] was that you would cross-fertilize going from one sector to the other,” Singer said. “I think that’s turned out to be very true. You’re a better nonprofit leader having had experience in another space. When you work only in the business sector, you don’t necessarily have an appreciation for the social impact of the work you do.”Sinclair agrees that Singer’s ability to synthesize her business background with an innovative outlook will make her a great mentor and career resource for Marshall students.“She’s extremely creative,” Sinclair said. “In a world like this, where you’re dealing with acute problems in dealing with families and children or huge bureaucratic snafus because you’re dealing with county agencies and things like that, Martine is good at either finding ways around the obstacles to better serve the families and the children or to find ways to get the agency to meet the needs we’re trying to meet.”Today, Singer’s duties as president and CEO include managing a $32 million budget, planning the restructuring activities necessary to turn a social services agency into an education provider and engaging the community in educational awareness programs among various other functions. She acknowledged the many challenges faced in the nonprofit sector.“Resources are always tight in nonprofits,” Singer said. “Not just money, but time — everyone is stretched really thin. I don’t think a lot of nonprofit leaders necessarily have the experience in business to give them the confidence to do something like this. Sometimes there is a lack among leadership of deep understanding of business.”Singer said she believes a business background and experiences like the social enterprise lab bring special insight and problem-solving skills to such challenges.“It gives [students] insight into the practical application of what they’re learning,” Singer said. “It gives them the opportunity to operationalize some of the things that they might be studying in a classroom environment. It’s a way of seeing things come to life.”For students interested in pursuing social entrepreneurship, Singer offered some advice.“They need to get some practical experience as interns or volunteers at non-profit [organizations],” she said. “They can bring a tremendous level of innovation and energy to a sector that isn’t necessarily always considered the most creative or the most entrepreneurial. They have a lot to offer if they can find a way in.”last_img read more