Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling (AP Photo) TEMPE, Ariz. – Head coach Bruce Arians, now in his fifth year with the Arizona Cardinals, meets the media several times leading up to game day.Here, in this space, with help from the Cardinals’ media relations staff, we’ll highlight many of the key topics and personnel conversations he has with reporters following practice.Opening statement:“The only people that did not practice were John Brown and D.J. Humphries. Everybody else was limited. A very, very spirited practice, an excellent practice. Our show teams did a hell of a job of giving a great picture and a great effort. I almost had to say, ‘Whoa,’ a few times, but it was a really good practice.” 1 Comments Share On if the extra day of rest paid off for the team yet:“Oh yeah. Yeah, we’re fresh as daisies right now.”On what he appreciates about the CB Patrick Peterson-WR Dez Bryant matchup:“Two great players, Pro Bowl players, All-Pro players going at each other all day long. So, neither one of them is going to back off. That’s for sure. That’s for sure.”On if he sees similarities between WR Larry Fitzgerald and TE Jason Witten in how they go about their business:“Yeah. If you look at the two guys who were the Walter Payton Man of the Year, they’re those types of guys for a reason. I believe in karma, and when you treat people like those two do, good things happen to you. Health has been blessed on both of them. Long careers, and they just maintain it.”On the play in which Witten ran down the field without a helmet and what that says about him:“He’s a winner. He’s another guy that kind of came out of college as a receiving tight end and became one of the best all-around tight ends there is.”On how TE Jermaine Gresham looked as he recovers from his rib injury:“He was slamming it up in there pretty good today. I pulled him out. I just didn’t want to have a setback because he was going after it. He knows he can do it, and I didn’t want to see him get hurt.” On why practice was so spirited:“I think they know the importance of the game. If you’re show teams show up every Wednesday or Thursday in pads, when you put pads on, you have no answer but to go full speed, or you get your ass kicked. So, it was great. It was great to see those young guys go after each other.”On whether the team is as fun-loving as he said it was back in camp:“I think so, yeah. Yeah. Our practice was really, really good and spirited and a lot of enthusiasm.”On if there were any changes to the first unit:“Not today. Offensively, Chris Johnson’s carries right now will be up. We could do something later in the week, but right now, nothing. He’d be the only one.”On his evaluation of Cowboys QB Dak Prescott out of college:“A great leader. A great leader. Any time you take Mississippi State to number one, you’re a hell of a player, you’re a hell of a leader. He went from a running quarterback to a passing quarterback. The improvement he made from his junior year to his senior year when they were spread and empty and throwing the ball a lot, (Mississippi State head coach) Danny Mullen did a great job with him. You could see the growth. Accuracy was up. You saw somebody that had a chance, but the one thing you knew you had was a natural born leader.” On how G/T Will Holden performed at tight end:“I think he did a great job for never having done it in his life. (He’s) a good athlete. The assignments, he had no mental errors. It’s a package that if we need, we can look forward to.”On the keys to stopping a motivated Cowboys RB Ezekiel Elliott:“He’s tough to stop anyways, but if and what he’s motivated by, I have no idea. But, he’s a handful.”On how S Budda Baker has improved during the first couple weeks of the season:“Oh gosh, night and day. He’s learning assignments, two positions and three different – four – packages. With the opportunities he’s been given, he’s made the best of. So hopefully, that earns more opportunities.”On what Baker does best:“Tackle. Play fast. Very instinctive, a very physical player.”On whether the key to getting the offense rolling is improved offensive line play:“Yeah, both offense and defense. Everything starts up front. That will never change.”On if $LB Deone Bucannon is fully cleared to play:“He’s getting real close. He looked good today. He was flying around.”On if Bucannon could be on a snap count:“Yes.” The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

left A painted line marks the sun shadow of th

first_img >>left>> A painted line marks the sun shadow of the South Vault at the exact time of the Equinox at 12:22 pm. >>right>> This is the first celebration on the new extension deck of the foundry. [Photos & text: sa] September 28, 2004 The Fall Equinox was celebrated on September 22. with an all-department picnic at the Arcosanti Foundry. [Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & text: sa] >>left>> A view from the foundry roof. >>right>> Foundry crew Ben Powell and Tom Sargent flip lots of burgers and vegi burgers. [left photo: Yuki Yanagimoto, right photo & text: sa] Paolo Soleri speaks to acknowledge the work on the new extension and explains a movable system of garment architecture that will shade the structure. More on this event will be posted on 9/29. [Photo & Text: sa]last_img read more

January 15 2016New York native Sifu Salvatore is

first_imgJanuary 15, 2016New York native Sifu Salvatore is part of Shaolin temple and is a frequent visitor to Arcosanti as he makes his way across the country. Throughout his visits he has engaged several community members and even took the time to share his knowledge of Kung Fu.[photos by Laura Villa Baroncelli, text by Hildemar Cruz]Traditionally trained in Shaolin style martial arts, he spend several days teaching residents a full sequence of moves. The training came about when planning manager Flavio Borrelli stumbled upon him practicing and Sifu extended an invitation to join. Every day thereafter a new participant joined the training, hopping from one community space to another until they found their way to the roof top of the East Crescent.Although this training is available for a limited time only, while Sifu remains at Arcosanti during his travels, the collective physical exchange is always very welcomed.last_img read more

Governor signs Whiteford gas leak cleanup legislation into law

first_img Bill ensures funds intended to clear spills are used appropriatelyGov. Rick Snyder today signed state Rep. Mary Whiteford’s legislation ensuring the cleanup of petroleum and other hazardous substances leaking from underground tanks in Michigan.Whiteford’s bill ensures the one-cent fee collected for each gallon of refined petroleum sold or imported in Michigan is used for its intended purpose of cleaning up contaminated sites.“This program protects the public and environment from harmful substances that leak from old underground tanks and contaminate our groundwater,” said Whiteford, of Casco Township. “This will ensure that money in the Refined Petroleum Fund is dedicated toward remediating and closing contaminated sites, as it was originally intended.”Additionally, Whiteford’s legislation allows all owners and operators of underground storage tank systems to apply for funds to clean up older contaminated sites. Under current law, funding is only awarded to pay for cleanup projects where the owner of the leaking tank is unknown.The new Legacy Release Program provides matching state funds up to $50,000 per site to clean up contamination and allows local units of government to be eligible for reimbursement of certain costs, up to $200,000 per claim.House Bill 4583 is now Public Act 134 of 2017.### 26Oct Governor signs Whiteford gas leak cleanup legislation into law Categories: Whiteford Newslast_img read more

In 2005 Francis Brauner was a quarter of the way

first_imgIn 2005, Francis Brauner was a quarter of the way through a 20-year prison sentence at Dixon Correctional Institute in Louisiana, when he had an accident.Brauner was imprisoned for a rape conviction, which he maintains was wrongful and part of a setup by a corrupt judge.His sentence involved hard labor, and one day he was out in the fields, cutting the grass and he bent over to pick something up from the ground. He felt a sharp pain in his back.”There’s no words to describe how bad the pain was, really,” he says. A few days later, it got worse. “It felt like I was hit by a bolt of lightning or something, I mean the pain just shot from my head to my toes.”Years before, he’d been in a car accident, so it was not the first time he had had back trouble. But this time, he could barely stand up.Prison authorities rushed him to Charity Hospital in New Orleans, but then Hurricane Katrina struck. In the chaos, Brauner found himself re-routed to Louisiana State Penitentiary, better known as Angola prison. There he was told he’d find a larger facility with better resources to treat inmates needing medical attention. But he says he was denied the surgery that might have helped.Instead, when he arrived he was left in a bed for a month, largely unattended. He developed wounds on his backside that became so infected, they nearly killed him.”My wounds got severe,” says Brauner, showing a photo of a large, circular gash on his backside. “It actually ate all of my muscle tissue and left gaping open wounds.”Brauner became paralyzed from the waist down and was stationed in the hospital ward of Angola prison.Lapses in careAngola prison is the largest maximum security prison in the country. There are over 6,000 men incarcerated there, most of them serving life sentences.The prison is more than 130 miles from New Orleans. Because of its remote location, most of the medical needs of the inmates are met by a small team of doctors, nurses and EMTs who also live on the grounds.Brauner started to notice that the medical staff were careless about their treatment. He decided to keep a journal to record what he perceived as lapses in medical care.”I started documenting,” Brauner says. “Everything that they did, that they said, day by day. I documented every day.” If a nurse gave out the wrong medication, he wrote that down. If a doctor failed to order a biopsy, he entered it in his journal.That documentation was shared with Nick Trenticosta, a lawyer who represents death penalty cases and was visiting Brauner for an unrelated case. Even though Trenticosta has been going to the prison practically every month for the past three decades, he didn’t recall ever seeing the hospital ward before. He was shocked.”There were open garbage containers,” Trenticosta recounted. “Fly tape hanging from the ceiling with a lot of dead flies on it. Over men’s beds who had open bedsores.”Taking legal actionSince then, the number of complaints about the medical care has increased. Then in 2015, a lawsuit was filed, Lewis v. Cain, accusing Angola prison of causing “needless pain and suffering.” Late last month, Judge Shelly Dick said the case could proceed as a class action lawsuit on behalf of Angola’s prisoners.After repeated requests, the prison’s lawyers would not comment. So to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside, we contacted former employees like Sandy Netherland-Roberts, a paramedic at Angola prison who later ran the hospice.”Budgetary wise, medical-wise, the place gives awesome care,” Netherland-Roberts says. “Do I feel that there is a better health care there than some people get in the outside world? One hundred percent.”According to Dr. Tobe Momah, who worked there for a year, many challenges stem from how long the men stay at Angola.”They’re going to be there for 40, 50 years, so they’re going to develop cancer, hypertension, diabetes…” Momah says. “So every time they have a need that is outside the scope of us five doctors, they have to leave the site.”Leaving the site is prohibitively expensive. And it’s costing the prison even more since Louisiana overhauled its safety net hospital system. Momah says under the circumstances, the medical staff was doing their best to care for the prison’s 6,000-plus inmates.”Well, I don’t know what he means by ‘the circumstances,’ ” says Nick Trenticosta, the lawyer, of Momah’s assessment. “If ‘the circumstances’ means, ‘We don’t have proper medication. We don’t have proper equipment. But we do the best we can,’ It’s like talking like a MASH unit. You know?”Prisoners are the only group in the United States who have a constitutional right to health care. At the core of this lawsuit is the question of what quality of health care prisoners deserve. To Dr. Momah, that is not up for debate.”The first law of medicine is, serve humanity irrespective of who they are,” says Dr. Momah. “So no doctor, as far as I know, will diminish care based on a person’s crime.”As resources have dried up, however, the prison is struggling to provide even basic care. The lawsuit demands more oversight, reforms and a bigger budget for medical care.As for Francis Brauner, he says that most of the men he was with on the chronic care ward at Angola prison have passed away. He was lucky.”I mean… I’m not sentenced to death and that’s the bottom line,” Brauner says. “I’m not sentenced to death.”Since finishing his sentence in 2015, Brauner has been living at a medical facility not far from the prison, waiting for surgery to help heal his wounds.This story was produced in collaboration with In These Times, and Katie Rose Quandt’s reporting was made possible by a grant from the Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting. Copyright 2018 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.last_img read more

A worldrenowned solo percussionist a mental heal

first_imgA world-renowned solo percussionist, a mental health campaigner, a digital inclusion expert and the founder of a travel review website are among the disabled people recognised in the new year honours list.The honours for non-sporting disabled recipients were swamped by nearly 60 awards for the ParalympicsGB team that brought back 64 gold medals from last summer’s Rio Paralympic Games.But the highest-ranking honour was awarded to Dame Evelyn Glennie, the solo percussionist who was made a Companion of Honour, for those who have made a lengthy and major contribution to the arts, science, medicine, or government.She said she felt “deeply honoured and humbled” to receive the award, for services to music.Dame Evelyn, who is profoundly Deaf, was the first person to successfully sustain a full-time career as a solo percussionist, and so far has amassed more than 80 international awards, including two GRAMMYs from the US music industry.Past Companion of Honour recipients include the writers Vita Sackville-West, Graham Greene, and E M Forster, composer Benjamin Britten, the actors Sir John Gielgud, Dame Judi Dench and Dame Maggie Smith, politicians Denis Healey, Ken Clarke and Paddy Ashdown, and the disabled physicist Stephen Hawking.Dame Evelyn (pictured) said: “I count myself blessed to be amongst such an eminent list of recipients for such a distinguished award.“As a musician, I am proud to represent the arts in this way. I also hold dear the responsibility of such a respected title, which I take very seriously.“I will do my best to ensure my work and legacy continues to help empower people around the world to truly listen.”She told Disability News Service (DNS) that the award would not change how she viewed her work, and that her “aims and goals remain as stalwart as ever, with clear determination to reach far and wide”.Dame Evelyn said the award would not make her part of the establishment, but instead would have the “complete opposite” effect.She said: “The freedom and creativity has always been at the heart of what I do, no matter what comes my way or what challenges arise.“I respect the establishment, as it opens up unexpected possibilities and new avenues of exploration.”Another recipient of an award is mental health campaigner Jonny Benjamin, best-known for his successful social media quest to find the stranger who convinced him not to end his own life.Benjamin, who receives an MBE, said he was “in complete shock”, but was “delighted” to be recognised.He told DNS that he had considered rejecting the honour in protest at the government’s welfare reforms and cuts to disability benefits.He has spoken out publicly about disabled people whose lives have been lost as a result of those reforms, and against the cuts of £30-a-week to new claimants of employment and support allowance placed in the work-related activity group, cuts that are due to take effect in April.He said he thought the MBE might help him access contacts in the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Education for campaigns he is planning around the need for reform of mental health support in schools and prisons.He said that 90 per cent of prisoners have a mental health issue, while suicides in prisons were the highest ever recorded last year.He said: “There’s a suicide every three days in prisons in England and Wales now.“We’ve got a crisis in our prisons that needs urgent attention.”He added: “I hoped, perhaps naively, that the MBE might bring more credibility to my name when trying to set up meetings and make a difference. Perhaps I’m wrong. Time will tell.”And he said he still had the option of handing back the MBE if he was proved wrong.He had earlier paid tribute to Neil Laybourn, the man who persuaded him not to take his life nine years ago, and who he said he feels “forever indebted to”.He said: “I hope this accolade may give some hope to others who might be struggling that there is life after a diagnosis of mental illness and that such a diagnosis should never put limitations upon anyone.”Robin Christopherson, a founding member of the disability charity AbilityNet, is awarded an MBE for services to digital inclusion.He said: “I’m hoping that receiving this award might help get the message out and inspire people to think about the needs of everyone around them and make sure they can all benefit from the power of technology and the internet to change their lives for the better.”Christopherson, who is blind, won the special award at AbilityNet’s Tech4Good awards last July, in recognition of his two decades of work as a “digital inclusion evangelist”.He said: “I’ve had the privilege to be AbilityNet’s ambassador for technology for many years, giving me the opportunity to demonstrate to audiences across the world how tech has the power to change and even transform people’s lives regardless of any disability or impairment they may have.“AbilityNet’s mission is to help people to reach their full potential. Over the last few decades we’ve seen a revolution that has almost infinitely expanded opportunities for people with disabilities and I feel very fortunate to have played a small part in spreading the word.”Jacqui Dyer, who was vice-chair of the government’s Mental Health Taskforce, and is a trustee of the Mental Health Foundation, an elected councillor in Lambeth, a health and social care consultant, and a mental health service-user, also receives an MBE.Dyer is a member of the ministerial advisory group for mental health, is the mental health equalities lead for NHS England, and co-chairs the process of developing the mayor of London’s mental health roadmap.Michael Holden, who founded the user-led accessible travel website Trip-ability, is recognised with an MBE.He is also an active member of Belfast Centre for Independent Living, a member of the European Network on Independent Living, and deputy chair of a patient working group at the Royal College of GPs Northern Ireland.Holden said: “I received a letter about the MBE but my wife Jennifer told me about it over the phone when I wasn’t at home and I immediately began to tremble with excitement.“My wife and I took our children to see the royal wedding of Prince William in London, which the children really enjoyed; my wife Jennifer and I cannot wait to see the look on their faces when we tell them we’re going to see the Queen.”Sarah Banks, who chairs the Ministry of Defence’s Civilian Defence Disability Network, which works to ensure line managers and disabled staff know where to go for advice on workplace disability issues, receives an MBE.Other disabled recipients of an MBE included Cath Caskie-Khan, chair of the Scottish Wheelchair Dance Association, and Rhona Elliot, founder of the MS Borders Racing Club, which raises money for the MS Society and awareness of multiple sclerosis by entering horses in the charity’s colours in races in the Scottish borders.Among Paralympians recognised were Lee Pearson, who receives a knighthood, Sophie Christiansen and Sascha Kindred, who receive CBEs, and Anne Dunham and Jody Cundy, who receive OBEs, while Tim Reddish, chair of the British Paralympic Association and himself a retired Paralympian, receives a CBE.Another receipient, with an MBE for services to education and disability sport, was Mike Spence, a former GB wheelchair rugby international, who coached the British team at last summer’s Invictus Games in the US, is a trustee of Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby, and is also a teaching assistant and former governor of a primary school in Gloucestershire.Picture: Dame Evelyn Glennie, in the BBC’s Living Shakespeare serieslast_img read more

Flat boron by the numbers

first_imgAddThis http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/01/2Dboron_angew_chem.jpgTwo-dimensional sheets of boron that can be lifted off a substrate are possible to make via several theoretical methods suggested in a new paper by Rice University scientists. The material could be a useful complement to graphene and other 2-D materials for electronics, they said. (Credit: Evgeni Penev/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/01/0204_BORON-2-web.jpgRice University theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson, right, and lab members Yuanyue Liu, left, and research scientist Evgeni Penev have calculated the energies that would be involved in creating two-dimensional sheets of boron, which would be similar to – but have better electrical qualities than – carbon-based graphene. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.If you do not wish to receive news releases from Rice University, reply to this email and write “unsubscribe” in the subject line. Office of News and Media Relations – MS 300, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005center_img ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduFlat boron by the numbersRice University researchers calculate what it would take to make new two-dimensional materialHOUSTON – (Jan. 31, 2013) – It would be a terrible thing if laboratories striving to grow graphene from carbon atoms kept winding up with big pesky diamonds.“That would be trouble, cleaning out the diamonds so you could do some real work,” said Rice University theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson, chuckling at the absurd image.Yet something like that keeps happening to experimentalists working to grow two-dimensional boron. Boron atoms have a strong preference to clump into three-dimensional shapes rather than assemble into pristine single-atom sheets, like carbon does when it becomes graphene. And boron clumps aren’t nearly as sparkly.Yakobson and his Rice colleagues have made progress toward 2-D boron through theoretical work that suggests the most practical ways to make the material and put it to work. Earlier calculations by the group indicated 2-D born would conduct electricity better than graphene.Through first-principle calculations of the interaction of boron atoms with various substrates, the team came up with several possible paths experimentalists may take toward 2-D boron. Yakobson feels the work may point the way toward other useful two-dimensional materials.The Rice team’s results appear this week in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition. Rice graduate student Yuanyue Liu and research scientist Evgeni Penev are co-authors of the paper.Yakobson’s lab first reported in a Nano Letters paper last year that unlike graphene, 2-D boron rolled into a nanotube would always be metallic. Also unlike graphene, the atomic arrangement can change without changing the nature of the material. Instead of the steady rank-and-file of hexagons in a perfect graphene sheet, 2-D boron consists of triangles. But boron could have vacancies – missing atoms – without affecting its properties.That’s the theory. The problem that remains is how to make the stuff.“We are, perhaps, so close,” Penev said. “Here we have conceived a material that resembles graphene, but is always conductive no matter what form it takes. What we’re doing now is exploring different possibilities to connect our theories with reality.”The best method, they calculated, might be to feed boron into a furnace with silver or gold substrates in a process called chemical vapor deposition, commonly used to make graphene. The substrate is important, Penev said, because the atoms have to spill onto the surface and stick, but not too strongly.“You have to have a substrate that doesn’t want to dissolve boron,” he said. “On the other hand, you want a substrate that doesn’t bind too strongly. You should be able to detach the boron layer.”Then, like graphene, these atom-thick boron sheets could be applied to other surfaces for testing and, ultimately, for use in applications.The study also calculated methods for creating sheets via saturation of boron atoms on the surface of boride substrates, and the evaporation of metal atoms from metal borides that leaves just the target atoms in a sheet.“There are a lot of reasons boron could be interesting,” said Liu, the paper’s first author. “Boron is carbon’s neighbor on the periodic table, with one less electron, which might bring in lots of new physics and chemistry, especially on the nanoscale. For example, 2-D boron is more conductive than graphene because of its unique electronic structure and atomic arrangement.“In fact, comparing (boron) with graphene is very helpful,” he said. “The state-of-art synthesis methods for graphene provide us good templates to explore 2-D boron synthesis.”Yakobson is thinking a step beyond the current work. “There are many groups, at Rice and elsewhere, working on 2-D boron,” he said. “To appreciate this work, you have to stand back and contrast it with graphene; in some sense, the synthesis of graphene is trivial.“Why? Because graphene is a God-given material,” he said. “It forms at the global minimum (energy) for carbon atoms – they go there willingly. But boron is a different story. It does not have a planar form as a global minimum, which makes it a really subtle problem. The novelty in this work is that we’re trying to trick it into building a two-dimensional motif instead of three.”The search for 2-D materials with varying qualities is hot right now; another new paper from Rice on a hybrid graphene-hexagonal boron nitride shows the need for a 2-D semiconductor to complement the material’s conducting and insulating elements.Yakobson hopes his study serves as a guideline for practical routes to other novel materials. “Now that there is a growing interest in a variety of 2-D materials, this may be a template,” he said.Yakobson is Rice’s Karl F. Hasselmann Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and professor of chemistry.The Department of Energy (DOE) supported the research. Computations were performed on the National Science Foundation-funded Data Analysis and Visualization Cyberinfrastructure at Rice, along with resources at the National Institute for Computational Sciences and the DOE’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.-30-Read the abstract at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201207972This news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/2013/01/31/flat-boron-by-the-numbers/Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Yakobson Research Group: http://biygroup.blogs.rice.edu/archives/category/group-newsImages for download:last_img read more

This Uplifting Tale of a Thrifty Woman Who Amassed a Fortune of

first_img May 8, 2018 Add to Queue 4 min read This Uplifting Tale of a Thrifty Woman Who Amassed a Fortune of Millions Is Also Kind of Discouraging Register Now » Next Article How to Become a Millionaire Entrepreneur Staff Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img –shares Peter Page The transition from wage slave to millionaire is pondered by many but successfully made by very few. One who accomplished it is the late Sylvia Bloom. Shortly before her death in 2016 at age 96 she surprised everyone who knew her by revealing a net worth of roughly $9 million, which she left mostly to scholarship funds.Bloom, the subject of a beautiful New York Times profile prompted by revelation of her $6.24 million bequest to the Henry Street Settlement, amassed her fortune through a combination of hard work, thrift and sensible investing that serves as an example for everyone struggling today for financial security. A little reading between the lines, however, reveals she got some important help along the way which once was available widely but now is not so much.Related: How Student Loans Are Crushing Millennial EntrepreneurialismBloom was born to immigrant parents in Brooklyn generations before it was cool. She grew up during the Great Depression, so everyone traumatized by the Great Recession can appreciate she had a rough start in life. She attended New York City’s public schools, eventually earning her bachelor degree attending New York’s public Hunter College at night while eking out a living working days (Bloom bequeathed $1 million for scholarships to Hunter College). In 1947, Bloom was one of the first support staff hired at the newly-founded Wall Street law firm of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, where she worked for 67 years as it grew to an international firm of 1,200 lawyers. Its “our practice” page lists 64 categories beginning with “Africa” and concluding with “white-collar defense and investigations.”Bloom’s niece, Jane Lockshin, told The New York Times her aunt paid attention to the stocks the Wall Street attorneys she worked for bought. When they bought, she bought (and presumably sold when they sold).Indisputably, she was thrifty. It seems no one ever saw her take a cab of any sort — yellow, Uber or Lyft. The day of the 9/11 attacks she was at work until she evacuated on foot (the Twin Towers were located near the offices of Cleary Gottlieb). She walked across the Brooklyn Bridge and took a bus home to the rent-stabilized apartment she shared for decades with her husband, a firefighter who became a public school teacher and part-time pharmacist in retirement. They had no children.Related: Loss of Net Neutrality Risks a Less Friendly Internet for EntrepreneursThis part of Bloom’s life story fits the uplifting narrative of self-determination: work hard, skimp, save, invest. Those are choices everyone can make for themselves. But many of the wise choices she made are more problematic today. A college degree is still a major asset in the job market worth working hard for, as Bloom did, but she probably graduated owing little or nothing. Today, 44.2 million Americans carry an average student loan burden of $37,000. The average monthly student loan payment for borrowers aged 20 to 30 years is $351.The rent-stabilized apartment in Brooklyn certainly had to have made it easier for Bloom to find money to invest. The median asking rent in New York City is around $2800 per month now. Like lots of young people today, Bloom went to work for a startup. Unlike lots of young people hustling in the gig economy today, she took a full-time job with an employer who provided benefits and a solid employment guarantee. Her husband was assured a pension when he retired from FDNY, unlike people today struggling to fund their own retirements.Related: 6 Regions Where Tech Jobs Boom the Housing Is Scary Expensive“She was a child of the Depression and she knew what it was like not to have money,” her niece said. “She had great empathy for other people who were needy and wanted everybody to have a fair shake.”Sylvia Bloom achieved something remarkable and rare, but you get the sense reading her story that she wasn’t smug about it. You get the feeling she would emphasize with the many thrifty people who, instead of slowly building wealthy, are hustling just to stay afloat. Maybe they can put a couple of bucks away for better times, but rent and loan payments come first. Image credit: Henry Street Settlement You can mimic her hard work and frugality but good luck finding a guaranteed cheap apartment or a college degree without student debt. Senior Editor for Green Entrepreneur Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

Apples pulls iPhone 7 8 from German stores in patent spat

first_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Apple is pulling older models of its iPhone from German stores after losing two patent cases brought by chipmaker Qualcomm, the company said Thursday. Citation: Apples pulls iPhone 7, 8 from German stores in patent spat (2018, December 20) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-apples-iphone-german-patent-spat.html Explore further Apple risks iPhone ban in Germany after court case losscenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Credit: CC0 Public Domain A regional court in Munich ruled that Apple and its subsidiaries had breached a European patent held by San Diego-based Qualcomm, which has pursued similar cases elsewhere around the world.”Qualcomm’s campaign is a desperate attempt to distract from the real issues between our companies,” Apple said in a statement.”Their tactics, in the courts and in their everyday business, are harming innovation and harming consumers,” it said. “Qualcomm insists on charging exorbitant fees based on work they didn’t do and they are being investigated by governments all around the world for their behavior.”Apple said that pending its appeal, the sale of iPhone 7 and 8 models will be halted at the 15 Apple stores in Germany. The company noted, however, that all iPhone models remain available from cellphone carriers and resellers in the country.The Munich court said Apple is “banned from offering or distributing unlicensed” devices that use the disputed patent, which regulates the amount of energy provided to the phones’ telecom chips.Apple said the iPhone X, which was also mentioned in the verdict, has since been replaced by a newer model.The court also ruled that Qualcomm should receive unspecified damages from Apple.It’s the second time this month that Apple has been dinged in a legal case brought by Qualcomm. A Chinese court banned some Apple subsidiaries from selling or importing certain iPhones in China after Qualcomm said they infringed on two patents enabling consumers to format photos and manage phone apps using a touch screen. Apple has asked the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court to reconsider the ruling.last_img read more

A look inside neural networks

first_img Today it’s almost impossible to find an area in which artificial intelligence is irrelevant, whether in manufacturing, advertising or communications. Many companies use learning and networked AI systems, for example to generate precise demand forecasts and to exactly predict customer behavior. This approach can also be used to adjust regional logistics processes. Healthcare also uses specific AI activities, such as prognosis generation on the basis of structured data. This plays a role for example in image recognition: X-ray images are input into an AI system which then outputs a diagnosis. Proper detection of image content is also crucial to autonomous driving, where traffic signs, trees, pedestrians and cyclists have to be identified with complete accuracy. And this is the crux of the matter: AI systems have to provide absolutely reliable problem-solving strategies in sensitive application areas such as medicinal diagnostics and in security-critical areas. However, in the past is hasn’t been entirely clear how AI systems make decisions. Furthermore, the predictions depend on the quality of the input data. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, HHI and Technische Universität Berlin have now developed a technology, Layer-wise Relevance Propagation (LRP), which renders the AI forecasts explainable and in doing so reveals unreliable problem solution strategies. A further development of LRP technology, referred to as Spectral Relevance Analysis (SpRAy), identifies and quantifies a broad spectrum of learned decision-making behaviors and thus identifies undesirable decisions even in enormous datasets.Transparent AI Citation: A look inside neural networks (2019, July 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-neural-networks.html In practice the technology identifies the individual input elements which have been used to make a prediction. Thus for example when an image of a tissue sample is input into an AI system, the influence of each individual pixel is quantified in the classification results. In other words, as well as predicting how “malignant” or “benign” the imaged tissue is, the system also provides information on the basis for this classification. “Not only is the result supposed to be correct, the solution strategy is as well. In the past, AI systems have been treated as black boxes. The systems were trusted to do the right things. With our open-source software, which uses Layer-Wise Relevance Propagation, we’ve succeeded in rendering the solution-finding process of AI systems transparent,” says Dr. Wojciech Samek, head of the “Machine Learning” research group at Fraunhofer HHI. “We’re using LRP to visualize and interpret neural networks and other machine learning models. We use LRP to measure the influence of every input variable in the overall prediction and parse the decisions made by the classifiers,” adds Dr. Klaus-Rob-ert Müller, Professor for Machine Learning at TU Berlin. Clarifying how artificial intelligence systems make choices Unreliable solution strategiesTrusting the results of neural networks necessarily means understanding how they work. According to the research team’s tests, AI systems don’t always apply the best strategies to reach a solution. For example, one well-known AI system classifies images based on context. It allocated photographs to the category “Ship’ when a large amount of water was visible in the picture. It wasn’t solving the actual task of recognizing images of ships, even if in the majority of cases it picked out the right photos. “Many AI algorithms use unreliable strategies and arrive at highly impractical solutions,” says Samek, summarizing the results of the investigations. Explore further More information: Sebastian Lapuschkin et al. Unmasking Clever Hans predictors and assessing what machines really learn, Nature Communications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08987-4 Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Artificial intelligence (AI) is already firmly embedded in our everyday lives and is conquering more and more territory. For example, voice assistants are already an everyday item in many people’s smartphones, cars and homes. Progress in the field of AI is based primarily on the use of neural networks. Mimicking the functionality of the human brain, neural networks link mathematically defined units with one another. But in the past it was not known just how a neural network makes decisions. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, HHI and Technische Universität Berlin have developed a technology that reveals the criteria AI systems use when making decisions. The innovative Spectral Relevance Analysis (SpRAy) method based on Layer-wise Relevance Propagation technology provides a first peek inside the “black box.” AI, machine learning and moreArtificial intelligence is concerned with the development of systems that can independently solve problems and act analogously to patterns of human thought and behavior. At present the greatest progress is being made in the area of machine learning, a subfield of AI. Machine learning deals with methods of extracting knowledge from data and independently learning contexts contained in the data. The progress is a result of using artificial neural networks based on connections between mathematical calculation units that in principle imitate the neural structure of the human brain. A subfield of machine learning, deep learning, covers a class of new procedures that make it possible to teach and train complex artificial neural networks. These networks consist of a large number of levels which are linked with one another in many-layered structures. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Here the AI system allocates the image to the correct category based on the copyright banner. Nevertheless, the solution strategy is defective. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Layer-wise Relevance Propagation provides a look inside the “black box.” Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Journal information: Nature Communications Here the AI system classifies an image as a train because tracks are present. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI The new Spectral-wise Relevance Analysis technology renders visible the criteria used by AI systems when making decisions. Credit: Fraunhofer HHI Watching neural networks thinkThe LRP technology decodes the functionality of neural networks and finds out which characteristic features are used, for example to identify a horse as a horse and not as a donkey or a cow. It identifies the information flowing through the system at each node of the network. This makes it possible to investigate even very deep neural networks.The Fraunhofer HHI and TU Berlin research teams are currently formulating new algorithms for the investigation of further questions in order to make AI systems even more reliable and robust. The project partners have published their research results in the journal Nature Communications.last_img read more