SELECTMEN NEWS Committee Created To Propose Changes To Annual Town Meeting

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Changes may be on the way for Annual Town Meeting, but not anytime in the immediate future.At Monday’s meeting, Selectman Mike McCoy asked his colleagues to put an article on this year’s Town Meeting warrant asking voters to change the dates of the Annual Town Election and Annual Town Meeting. McCoy noted the recent Bylaw Review Committee, which he served on, was supportive of changing the date of Annual Town Meeting.Under McCoy’s proposal, the Town Election would fall on the third Saturday of March and the Town Meeting would fall on the fourth Saturday of March. McCoy felt turnout would increase with less conflicts predicted in late March as compared to early May, when First Communions, spring youth sports, and yard work are all in full swing.While his colleagues didn’t necessarily dismiss the idea, they opted not to support it. Instead, Selectmen unanimously agreed to form a Town Meeting Review Committee on the suggestion of Town Moderator Robert Peterson, Jr.“I have no opposition to moving Town Meeting… but I ask the board when moving the date, that you consider taking a holistic approach to the issue of Town Meeting,” Peterson told the board. “I do strongly suggest the Town consider doing some sort of Town Meeting Review Committee…. There are things we can look at to speed the process along, whether it be consent agendas or electronic voting…”“I think Mr. Peterson’s idea is a great idea,” responded Selectman Jonathan Eaton. “I’d rather a solution come from the community than this board. I don’t want to make a change now and then have to change it again next year. My preference is to start a committee as soon as possible and solicit feedback. There’s a lot of good in the survey we’ve conducted, but we have a lot of questions that we need to do some more digging on.”“I agree. Let’s have a review committee. But let’s add a caveat that they need to have something decided in time so we can put something on warrant for next year’s meeting. Let’s get it going now so it’s ready for next year’s warrant,” agreed Selectman Ed Loud.“I’d be inclined to develop a subcommittee and for them to come back and give us a report on which way to go,” concurred Selectman Kevin Caira.The makeup of the Committee is yet to be fleshed out, but it sounded like each Selectman will appoint three members to a 15-member committee.All Selectman also seemed unanimous in their desire to keep the Town Meeting on Saturday, as opposed to moving it to a weeknight or multiple weeknights.“I’m concerned about seniors, some of which are less likely to drive at night,” pointed out Selectman Greg Bendel, who was also cool to the idea of a March Town Meeting. “I worry about a March Meeting. We had 5-6 snow days at school last March. We’d still be running into winter weather. What would happen if Town Meeting were to get snowed out, which unfortunately is a possibility in New England in March.”“This is an impossible problem to try to solve. 23,000 people live in Wilmington,” added Selectman Eaton. “There’s always going to be a conflict… A lot of the themes I saw [in the town meeting survey] was that weeknights weren’t good for seniors, but weekends were tough for parents.”Town Manager Jeff Hull cautioned that moving the Town Meeting too early in the year would create issues for the town’s budget process.“The Governor doesn’t present his budget [which includes state aid, the town’s second largest revenue source] until the end of January. If we have a Town Meeting at the end of March, I have to present the budget to the Board of Selectmen at the end of December, well before the Governor’s,” explained Hull. “It just creates a greater level of uncertainty when putting the budget together.”“Clearly we had some past Town Meetings – like the new high school vote – where a significant amount of people showed up. To some measure, [attendance] is a function of what the topics are at the Town Meeting,” Hull later added. “When people really want to turn out – hockey rink, new High School, new Middle School — people turn out when there are issues that they want to be heard on. I’m not sure that any particular date is going to solicit a groundswell of interest.”Any date change would need Town Meeting approval and then require an act of the State Legislature.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSelectmen & Residents Are Ready To “Fix” Annual Town Meeting, Possibly Move It From Saturday To 2-3 WeeknightsIn “Government”SELECTMEN NEWS: Town Clerk Concerned With Moving Town Meeting To March; Review Committee To Be Appointed SoonIn “Government”ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE GETS TO WORK: 20 Building Projects Happening In Town RIGHT NOWIn “Business”last_img read more

Houston Researcher Studies Zealandia — The Mostly Underwater Continent

first_img Share TRT World 00:00 /10:37 There’s a continent that’s nearly 2 million square miles, yet most people have never heard of it. No surprise, since more than 90 percent of this huge landmass is submerged under the Pacific Ocean. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen It’s called Zealandia, and, in 2017, Rice University professor Jerry Dickens was part of a drilling expedition to better understand this continent.At the time of the expedition, Houston Matters producer Maggie Martin connected with Dickens via satellite from his research vessel in the Pacific just as his group of researchers was beginning to drill at their first location. Xlast_img

Elon Musks Las Vegas Tunnel Plans Are Worrying Monorail Officials

first_img 3 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. This story originally appeared on Engadget August 2, 2019 Planning documents, obtained by TechCrunch, are revealing much about how Elon Musk’s proposed Las Vegas loop would work. The Boring Company is charged with building three tunnels: one for pedestrians and two for passenger “sleds,” stretching across the Las Vegas Convention Center Campus. The two vehicle tunnels will be filled with a fleet of autonomous Tesla-based EVs that can carry up to 16 people at a time.There are concerns, however, that the tunneling work required to build Musk’s loop is running too close to the adjacent Las Vegas Monorail. As TechCrunch reports, Monorail officials have lobbied for more oversight and raised objections over tunnels running close to the Monorail’s support pillars. Given the tight tolerances involved, it’s likely that a small amount of disruption could shut the elevated railway down.The Las Vegas Convention Center is a sprawling complex with around 3.2 million square feet of exhibit space across its numerous halls. In short order, a new building, with an additional 1.4 million square feet of space will be added, with construction underway on Elvis Presley Boulevard. That expansion — dubbed “Phase Two,” is expected to open in 2023, followed by an expensive renovation of the existing buildings.If you wanted to talk from the front door of the South Hall to the new building, you’ll be traveling almost a full mile. That half-hour walk each way is hardly ideal for trade show visitors trying to cover so much ground in a short space of time. And so the organization began looking for people movers that could shrink that distance, with Musk’s loop standing out as an early contender.The plans suggest a route that runs from the Phase Two building, through the central parking lot of the LVCC, ending at the back of the South Hall. At ground level, small subway-like entrances would filter down to a mezzanine, below which you’d find the two platforms. What isn’t clear, right now, is how the pods would get out of each other’s way when they reach the terminus at each end with no turning space.At this point, the suggestion is that the self-driving passenger sleds will be based on Tesla’s electric vehicles. But according to comments made Boring Company official Jane Labanowski, these vehicles will have a human driver, or at least an operative. That’s likely to increase the price and cost of riding, at least if things don’t change between now and the proposed project deadline of January 2021.These preliminary documents are clearly not exhaustive architectural plans, and so we can’t draw too many conclusions from them. But, if the system is as simple as a manned Tesla vehicle running through a tunnel, then the finished project could be quite underwhelming. And expensive, compared to the cost of, say, simply marking one of the nearby roads exclusively for shuttle buses that go back and forth between the halls. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now »last_img read more