DONEGAL STUDENT NURSES MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD AT PROTEST

first_imgThe student nurses from LYIT make their voices heard at the protest yesterday.A group of nursing students from LYIT were among more than 700 student nurses and midwives and supporters who gathered outside Dr.Steeven’s Hospital yesterday for a demonstration against the situation facing them as they graduate.A number of speakers talked about their own personal experiences on the day and the challenges that they face.The USI campaign, which has been initiated by students in third level education studying to become nurses and midwives in the future, seeks to highlight deficiencies in the pay and working conditions of student/intern nurses and midwives. Students say that the initial training rate of €6.49* for intern student nurses/midwives is grossly unfair. Interning nurses and midwives work long shifts and often work just as hard as a full nurse.In many cases, student nurses and midwives are filling the gaps that exist due to what USI believes are staff shortages and overworked busy wards. Students call for the state to pay a fair wage for the work that is carried out during this “Training” phase.Graduate nurses and midwives starting salary is currently €23,129 (85% of the staff starting pay for the first year and 90% in the second year).The group believe that this salary is too low for nurses and midwives after four years of training. Coupled with long hours and an understaffing crisis, many graduates are opting to leave. When benchmarked against other countries, the group say that graduate nurses and midwives start on much higher salaries and have much better supports and further training opportunities available. USI is requesting that Minister James Reilly brings about an increase in pay for the graduate nurse scheme and a conversation to ensue about the increase in the student intern pay.USI President Joe O’Connor said: “Anyone living and working in Ireland is entitled to a living wage; in particular the ones that care for the public. The majority of 2013 graduate nurses and midwives have left Ireland to work abroad. This unfair treatment cannot continue. If it does, we will be left with a problem of epidemic proportions: no nurses or midwives left to work in our hospital wards.“The shortage of staff is already apparent on many wards and the added responsibility left on the shoulders of intern nurses and midwives as they try and learn the ropes. James Reilly needs to understand that when he said “emigrate or work in a fast food service if unhappy”, many graduates took him at his word – and now the situation needs to be rectified”. DONEGAL STUDENT NURSES MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD AT PROTEST was last modified: March 7th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegaldublinLYITproteststudent nurseslast_img read more

Minister brings #RuralOpportunity to Donegal

first_imgMichael Ring TD, Minister for Rural and Community Development, was today joined by Government colleagues and members of rural communities from Donegal, Sligo and Mayo at a #RuralOpportunity event in Bluestack Hall, Drimarone, Co Donegal.The event was focused on raising awareness of the wide variety of Government supports available to rural areas throughout the region. The event also provided advice on how to access Project Ireland 2040 funding for rural, or community, projects.Minister Ring was joined at the event by Joe McHugh TD, Minister for Education and Skills and Seán Canney TD, Minister of State for Community Development, Natural Resources and Digital Development. Groups from rural areas in Donegal, Sligo and Mayo, that have an interest in accessing Government supports, were invited to attend.The audience heard from a number of individuals, from the region, about how funding has enabled them to deliver their successful projects:Included was Pól McFadden, Chairperson of the Falcarragh Parish Development Association spoke about how the delivery of a new community centre was supported by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and the LEADER programme.Speaking at the event, Minister Ring said that the case studies presented at the event are inspiring. He said “Just listening to the people speak here today about how funding for rural projects is strengthening communities and building resilience has certainly inspired me. I hope that these stories will encourage others to apply for funding for their projects. Across Government we have made the supports available to assist projects that are sustainable and will make Ireland a better place for us all.”He added “I think it is particularly appropriate that we are here in Donegal today for this event. Through Project Ireland 2040 we have an extremely ambitious plan for investment in Border regions and I want to take this opportunity today to reassure everyone that supporting communities in the border area is a priority for the Government.”Minister McHugh congratulated Minister Ring on this initiative and also for all of his support for projects here in Donegal.He said “Project Ireland 2040 is a major investment by the Government. We are doing this to make sure that as the population of the country grows we have balanced regional development and rural areas are attractive places for families to live.“We have many skilled and talented people living in rural areas and in order to retain them we have to invest in rural infrastructure. These rural opportunity events show that we are prepared to do that.” Minister brings #RuralOpportunity to Donegal was last modified: April 12th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Welcome to the Age of Robot Reporters

first_imgNozzl was founded by a team of ex-newspaper reporters and engineers. They got out when it was clear the newspaper industry was in trouble, but now they aim to give something back by bringing together the real-time, programmatic possibilities of the web with the reporting of the newspapers. Reporters have for decades written programming scripts that repeat database queries over and over again to extract public data for bulk analysis. The Nozzl team has taken that to the next level and combined it with new social media.The company put up a demo page for Portland, Oregon news that anyone can look at today. The public records streams are the big value-add and are fully customizable per newspaper. Visitors can then type live filter terms into the box at the bottom of the widget to zero in on topics of interest to them. That’s the nozzle in Nozzl Media.User Experience is Hard For RobotsUnfortunately, there are two big issues here. First, the flow of Tweets is overwhelming and undifferentiated. On the demonstration site you see almost nothing else unless you can think of something to filter for. If automated Twitter feeds hold value for local news, they will probably require some smart pre-proccessing before being presented to the reading public.There have always been people who like to listen to police radio scanners. Myself, I like to read restaurant health inspection reports, building permit applications and liquor license applications. If Nozzl had some categories I could choose between, that would be very helpful.The second, and more interesting, problem is that the public records that are extracted are exciting in theory but relatively unreadable in practice. The truth is, Nozzl didn’t exactly tell me that there was an unconscious person reported at Nike HQ today – it told me with code from a form that there was an UNCONS/UNRESPONSIVE report at 1 SW Bowerman Drive, in Portland. A little Mad-Libs style transformation of forms into human-readable sentences and some pre-fetching of names associated with addresses could go a long way. Run the name associated with that address through a News search engine and tell me if it’s an entity that’s been reported on in the past – if so then it’s probably high-priority news to push live again. The company needs to put these machine-readable pages it displays into coherent English sentences, or find some other solution. Don’t Forget the HumansAmbulances to Nike’s Headquarters to help someone unconscious today? That sounds like it could be news. Even if the technology presented the information this clearly – it may take a human eye to pick a story like that out of a list of automatically captured ambulance reports. Having a human available to pick up a phone, call Nike HQ and ask who was found unconscious there this afternoon would add another element of value to this data – but that’s not what Nozzl is looking to do. The company is serving up raw data to news consumers.In the end, human reporters and raw robot feeds sound like a great combination. That appears to be what Nozzl is aiming to create by offering its widgets to established news organizations. The company says that a mobile application could be in its future, too. That’s something I’m very excited about. Be it a widget or a mobile app, Nozzl’s robot reporters need more polish before they are ready to win back the hearts of fast-leaving newspaper readers. As a picture of the future, though – Nozzl is very inspiring.Interested in what companies like Nozzl Media mean for the future of the web? Check out our profile of Nozzl and ten other case study companies in our recent research report The Real-Time Web and Its Future. One hour ago, three emergency vehicles responded to a report of an unconscious person at the world headquarters of Nike Inc. in Portland, Oregon. How do I know? An automated form-pumping robot from startup company Nozzl Media told me.Nozzl Media today unveiled a demonstration of its first product, a widget intended for newspaper websites seeking to display real-time local information derived from Twitter messages, blog posts and automatically extracted public records like restaurant health inspections, building reports and public safety emergency responses. It’s like a little robot reporter and the company plans on offering it as a mobile app in the future as well. Nozzl raises questions, though, about what constitutes news and whether or not human reporters are expendable in the news process. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#news#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… marshall kirkpatrick Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Weatherization Funding’s Hot State/Cold State Balance

first_imgStaying warm in the winter uses more energy, generates twice the carbon dioxide, and costs twice as much as staying cool during the summer, according to data compiled by the government’s Energy Information Administration.Accordingly, cold-climate states (many of which also endure hot, muggy summers) have historically gotten the lion’s share of weatherization funds: 84%, versus the 16% share apportioned to warm-climate states. But because the federal government’s $5 billion commitment to weatherization is so large, it triggered the use of a special allotment formula – the result of a political concession made in 1995 to Sun Belt lawmakers – that boosts southern states’ share of weatherization funding to 31%.As a recent New York Times story notes, the South is – potentially, at least – about to trek far more aggressively than ever before into weatherization for low-income households.The tradeoffs of the special allotment formula are certainly not lost on weatherization advocates, especially because it won’t squeeze the most energy-saving benefit from each weatherization dollar. “If you were doing it on a national basis,” Steven Nadel, executive director of the pro-weatherization nonprofit American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, told the Times, “you’d do the most cost-effective jobs first, which would mean doing a lot in places like the Dakotas and Minnesota.”On the other hand, more people were dying from extreme heat than extreme cold, J. Bennett Johnston, a former Democratic senator from Louisiana who pushed for the revised allotment formula, told the paper. “This was not so much an energy saving proposal,” he said. “It was more of an equity proposal, one that gave attention to public health.”last_img read more

Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old). We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we talked with Charles Morton, MD. Dr. Morton is a Developmental Pediatrician at a major hospital in Urbana, IL. Dr. Morton retired as a colonel in the Air Force after over twenty years of service. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Describe your current role.I see children who have delays, autism, behavior issues, complex ADHD, Down syndrome, and other chronic and physical disabilities.What’s your favorite part of your current job?I really enjoy meeting with the families and interacting with the children.Tell us about experiences you have had working with military families.I spent 22 years active duty in the Air Force, so my heart is really with military families and the stresses they face.How did you come to work with military families?I got an Air Force Scholarship to medical school and stayed for a career. Now the closest military base is over a hundred miles away, but we have reserve and guard families and just some military families who live here in Central Illinois.Describe a rewarding experience working with military families.With every family with a direct military connection – they are dependents – there is an instant bond and feeling of well-being knowing they have a physician who has lived their life to some degree and understands their often-difficult situation. Because some families are so removed from the military, the spouse doesn’t often realize the benefits they can access, even TRICARE insurance in some cases.Describe a challenging experience working with military families.While TRICARE (military insurance program) makes it easy to access services, payment for TRICARE services is rather meager, which reduces the degree of access to some doctors. This makes me sad because these families are under a lot of stress that most civilians do not understand.From your experience, how are military families similar and different from other types of families? How do you change your practice between families?The similarity is that they have the same health concerns, but the difference is that they have specialized massive stress related to the actual or potential deployment of the military member. Sometimes military families have better access to healthcare than some families, but often theirs is more limited, and the families have little understanding of the different TRICARE health plans.As providers, how can we support military parents who are deployed or away frequently due to trainings/school? It would be wonderful if we were somehow notified that the military member was going to be gone so we could find a way to ease the family’s access to our systems.Describe a specific stressor that military families with whom you have worked have shared or experienced.I saw a family here in the states that had a permanent change of station to overseas. This family had an Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) need that arose after they arrived overseas. They had to request an EFMP family reassignment, which was challenged within the service member’s chain of command, but was eventually allowed to occur.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?Young military families are often as alone as their civilian counterparts and often just have to be pointed in the right direction to make something happen. More experienced families have learned a lot about networking,If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?When I left the military 10 years ago I was surprised by how little the civilian health care system worked together. The military is all about teamwork. Individuals in the civilian sector are often left to their own devices to determine what they need and to procure those resources. That is not something military families have had to do within the military healthcare system.The civilian population recognizes that military families are under extra stress and there is a strong feeling that resources should be provided to them. How military families are able to find those resources is a problem. If those of us within the civilian health care system could establish a better network of care for our military families, including medical and community resources, then that might be a great help. Networking is how a lot of services are found.What types of resources have you sought out to feel more confident and competent at meeting the specific needs of military families? (e.g., trainings, blog posts, organizations, etc.)I have a network of current and former military developmental pediatricians that I can tap when I have a question about a child, a parent, a service or a system. Of course there can be no HIPAA violations, but general information can be of great help. A more direct link that would allow for HIPAA information to be shared with the military EFMP or health care system would be helpful. However, this is perhaps impossible.This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

The 5 Most-Underrated College Football Teams By The Oddsmakers Entering 2016

first_imgCollege Football Playoff trophy on top of sportsbook board.National TitleYesterday, we ranked the five most-overrated college football teams in the country based on the odds the sports books are giving them to win the national championship. Twitter/Playoff.Twitter/Playoff.You can see those five teams here. Now, we’re ranking the five most-underrated teams by the oddsmakers. These are five teams whose national championship odds are a little too low, in our opinion. So, yes, these five teams – in our opinion – would be good teams to bet on to win it all. As we did with the five most-overrated teams’ feature, we’re using Bovada’s national title odds, which you can see here. Here are the five most-underrated college football teams in the country heading into the season. Start With No. 5 ??? >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6last_img read more

Ohio State womens basketball wraps up home schedule vs Nebraska and Illinois

OSU sophomore guard Asia Doss (20) defends during a game against Northwestern on Jan. 28 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorAfter playing on the road for the past two contests, the No. 7 Ohio State women’s basketball team (21-4, 13-1) gets to play on its home court for the next week.Occupying the Big Ten’s top spot, the Buckeyes are set to face off against Nebraska (17-8, 8-6) Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. After a win over Michigan State on Sunday, the Huskers come to Columbus looking to keep their energy alive and pull off an upset in the mid-February matchup.The Buckeyes, however, are more focused than ever, keeping their eyes focused on the mission while understanding that every team that steps onto the hardwood against them is looking to take away their crown. “Everybody wants to take the person that’s on top out,” said junior forward Shayla Cooper. “Every night we need to come prepared.”OSU coach Kevin McGuff has harped on the mental toughness his team must have coming down the stretch of the regular season and heading into the conference tournament, especially because of its high ranking. But for now, the Scarlet and Gray are determined to take care of business one game at a time.In the all-time series history between the two programs, Nebraska holds a 7-5 lead. Nonetheless, OSU was the team that came out on top last time, a 78-60 victory in March to finish the 2014-15 regular season.Precise post playWhen it comes to Nebraska’s scoring attack, the Huskers turn to their freshman forward Jessica Shepard. Her scoring average of 20.6 points per game ranks fifth in the Big Ten. OSU sophomore forward Alexa Hart (22) during a game against Northwestern on Jan. 28 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorShepard understands the game well for a freshman and knows when to kick the ball out to her teammates when the defense begins to collapse. Being one of the top 3-point shooting teams in the Big Ten, the 6-foot-4 Shepard keeps her head on a swivel to find the open woman and get high-quality shots. With the Buckeyes having a guard-heavy roster, their main focus will be to protect the paint and prevent Shepard from being an offensive threat.“(The Cornhuskers) have a really nice post player,” Cooper said of Shepard. “And they have really nice shooters that spot up. We just have to defend the post and get out to the 3-point shooters.”Shepard’s effectiveness doesn’t end with the scoring column, though. She dominates the boards as well, averaging 8.9 rebounds per game, including 3.2 offensive rebounds per contest. With these statistics in mind, OSU will need to go back to the fundamentals and make sure it boxes out on all defensive possessions to prohibit second-chance opportunities. The Buckeyes are in second-to-last place in defensive rebound percentage. Conversely, the Cornhuskers — powered by Shepard’s prowess on the glass — are third in the conference in that category. Rebounding, it seems, will be a major factor in declaring a winner. Senior SundayThe Buckeyes are slated to play their last home game of the season Sunday against Illinois. It will be the second meeting between these two teams this year. The first matchup came on Feb. 1 in Champaign, Illinois, when OSU won 80-70. The OSU women’s basketball program will honor its two senior guards, Ameryst Alston and Cait Craft, on Sunday in a pregame ceremony, as it scheduled to be their last moments in scarlet and gray at the Schott in the regular season.The two have been fixtures of McGuff’s team since he arrived in Columbus, starting each game they played in during the last three seasons. Alston in particular has been one of the standouts of the program’s history, as she was on the All-Big Ten first team during her sophomore and junior seasons and recently eclipsed the 2,000-point mark for her career.This season, Alston has started all 25 games, averaging 18.8 points and a team-high 3.8 assists per contest. Craft has started the 24 games she appeared in, averaging just 4.9 points per game but ranking third on the team with 23 3-pointers made and regularly receiving the opposition’s top defensive assignments.Tipoff for the matchup against the Fighting Illini is set for 2 p.m. read more

Sullinger gets 1st team JaJuan Johnson takes Big Ten Player of the

Two days after missing out on the opportunity to earn a share of the Big Ten title, Purdue senior forward JaJuan Johnson learned he won’t walk away from this season empty-handed, as he was named the Big Ten Player of the Year for the 2010–11 season. Johnson beat out Ohio State freshman forward Jared Sullinger, who appeared to have a lock on the award for the first three months of the season before seeing stat lines decline in February. Sullinger won four Big Ten Player of the Week awards this season. Johnson finished the regular season as the Big Ten’s leader in scoring and blocks, with averages of 20.5 points and 2.4 blocks per game. He was also the conference’s No. 4 leader in rebounds, pulling down 8.1 per game. A native of Indianapolis, Johnson’s top scoring performance — 31 points — came in Purdue’s Dec. 18 win against Indiana State; however, his best all-around performance came in the Boilermakers’ Feb. 27 win against Michigan State, when he scored 20 points and posted season highs in rebounding and blocks, with 17 and seven, respectively. In winning the award, which has been given out annually since the 1984–85 season, Johnson became the third Boilermaker to be named the Big Ten’s top player, joining Steve Scheffler (1989–90) and Glenn Robinson (1993–94). Besides winning the Big Ten Player of the Year award, Johnson was an All-Big Ten first-team selection, and was named the Big Ten’s Player of the Week on Feb. 28. Johnson wasn’t the only Boilermaker to beat out a Buckeye for an award, as Purdue coach Matt Painter was chosen as the Big Ten’s Coach of the Year. The Buckeyes, however, didn’t walk away empty-handed, as Sullinger was named the conference’s Freshman of the Year, and freshman point guard Aaron Craft was named the Big Ten’s Sixth Man of the Year. Craft downplayed the individual significance of the award. “I am fortunate to play on a team full of incredibly talented players,” Craft said in a press release. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to contribute this season.” Sullinger echoed the humbleness of his classmate’s reaction. “I was honestly surprised to hear I was named Freshman of the Year,” Sullinger said in the press release. “There are a lot of talented freshmen in the Big Ten.” Besides their individual awards, Sullinger was named to the All-Big Ten first team, and Craft was named to the All-Defensive team. Both freshmen were also named to the All-Freshman team. Other Buckeyes honored Monday include fifth-year senior forward David Lighty, who was named to the All-Big Ten second team and All-Defensive team; junior guard William Buford, who was selected to the All-Big Ten second team; senior guard Jon Diebler, who was named to the All-Big Ten third team; and senior center Dallas Lauderdale, who was named the Buckeyes’ Big Ten Sportsmanship award honoree. “We are fortunate to play in a tremendous league with outstanding players,” Matta said in the press release. “To have five of our top six players recognized with postseason honors is a tribute to their hard work.” Big Ten action resumes Thursday with the Big Ten Tournament in Indianapolis. read more

Late Louisville goal upends OSU mens soccer

Rainy conditions at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium weren’t the only downside to the Ohio State men’s soccer team’s loss Wednesday. The No. 5-ranked Louisville Cardinals, which ended OSU’s season a year ago in the NCAA tournament, snapped the Buckeyes’ 12-game unbeaten streak with a 1-0 win. An 82nd minute goal from Louisville redshirt senior midfielder Kenney Walker gave the Cardinals the score they needed to come out on top. Louisville entered the game averaging 2.33 goals per game, but the first half of the game was a defensive battle. Louisville controlled the ball for most of the first half, but OSU junior goalie Matt Lampson was up to the task, making five saves in the half. The Cardinals attempted nine shots to OSU’s four in the first half. “(Matt) had a lot to do tonight,” OSU coach John Bluem said. “He handled everything that was thrown at him very well.” Junior midfielder Chris Hegngi stopped the Cardinal’s shooting streak, putting a shot slightly outside of the net with just under 11 minutes left in the first half. It was the only Buckeye shot-on-goal of the first half. At the 40-minute mark in the second half, Hegngi found OSU freshman forward Kenny Cuningham just feet from the net. Cunningham’s header brought the crowd to its feet, but his effort glanced off the crossbar and the game remained scoreless. “I saw it in the air and put my head on it,” Cunningham said. “I thought it was going in, but it was about six inches, maybe a foot from the line.” Inside the 37-minute mark of the second half, Cardinals senior forward Colin Rolfe put a shot on goal that appeared to be destined for the back of the net. But Lampson came up big, diving to ground just far enough to make a one handed stop and leaving the game tied. With 8:24 left in the contest, a Louisville throw-in was kicked around OSU’s penalty area and eventually made its way to Walker. Walker cracked a shot through the crowd of Buckeyes and Cardinals and the ball rolled by Lampson, giving the Cardinals the 1-0 lead. Hegngi got a wide open shot with under a minute left, but the ball sailed wide left. “It was really close… I just tried to get it to the post,” Hegngi said. “It was like an inch away. I’m really sorry I couldn’t score there.” The Cardinals went on to win, 1-0. “We know how we can play,” Cunningham said after the game. “We know we can go against anyone in the country.” Bluem said it was unfortunate that his team couldn’t score in the contest, saying, “If Cunningham scores five minutes into the second half on the header that hits the crossbar and we go up 1-0, then we make life very difficult for them.” On Sunday, the Buckeyes open Big Ten conference play at Michigan. Kickoff is set for 4 p.m. read more