Conference addresses climate change

first_imgThe inaugural Climate Change and the Common Good Conference, an event focused on the “multidisciplinary exploration of the challenges and opportunities society faces in addressing climate change and resource scarcity,” was held April 8-10 in McKenna Hall. “[The conference was designed] to show how an important scientific issue also demands help,” associate biology professor Jessica Hellmann said. This multidisciplinary event brought together the fields of technology, science, theology and philosophy in facing this issue. “We wanted to show the University that climate change is critical to our mission,” she said. Almost 450 people registered for the event, and attendees included representatives of various universities as well as members of the local community. The topics of the conference included “The Long Thaw: How humans are changing the next 100,000 years of Earth’s climate,” “Jane Austen vs. Climate Economics” and “An Inconvenient Mind: The Mental Barriers to Confronting Climate Change.” “[We hope to] strike a balance between scientific theory [and understand] the response of the religious community, particularly the Catholic religious community and how it is that other responsible communities are responding,” theology professor Robin Darling Young said. On Monday, the conference included “several interesting talks and discussions with the audience,” Professor Hellmann said. “Two speakers presented different strategies of reducing different greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. “Both agreed, however, that without action, society is on a disastrous course that will threaten human lives and environmental health.” The panel of scientific researchers spoke about the need for scientists to help society understand the scope of the climate challenge. Professor of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences at the University of California, San Diego Veerabhadran Ramanathan opened the conference with a talk on ways to reduce black carbon emissions in India. The last talk of the conference will be given today by Bob Doppelt, instructor at the University of Oregon who will speak on Buddhist base theory and the process of “get[ting] out of the self-centered communist mentality.” Video tapes of the conference will be available at a later date through the event’s website the event website at http://climatechange.nd.edu/ Contact Charitha Isanaka at cisanaka@nd.edulast_img read more

At the Supreme Court’s request: Bar to study the need for unbundled legal services

first_img June 1, 2000 Associate Editor Regular News At the Supreme Court’s request: Bar to study the need for unbundled legal services At the Supreme Court’s request center_img Bar to study the need for unbundled legal services Mark D. Killian Associate Editor Facing an ever-increasing number of pro se litigants in family courts, the Supreme Court has asked the Bar to study the possible need for “unbundled legal services.”If the committee finds the need exists for unbundled legal services, Chief Justice Major B. Harding, in an administrative order, asked the Bar to submit a proposed rule amendment to facilitate the use of such services no later than March 1, 2001.“This is a very significant committee that will be investigating an important subject to most attorneys,” said Bar President Edith Osman, noting any changes could have a profound impact on lawyers who bill by the hour.The unbundling of legal services — also sometimes known as discrete task representation — would allow the client to select which activities will be performed by the lawyer and which will be performed by the client, if they are performed at all. The client may also specify the extent of each service the lawyer is to perform.Osman said the study committee also must investigate how unbundled legal services might transcend family law or if it can be limited to family practice. That, she said, is why she intends to appoint lawyers who practice in the areas of real property and commercial litigation as well as members of the family bar to the study committee.“The purpose of unbundling legal service is to provide greater access to the legal system to more people,” Osman said. “For example, middle class clients could obtain a lawyer for just those parts of a case they are concerned about.”Family Law Section Chair Ky Koch said limited representation in a divorce case could be as simple as helping decide who gets to keep the cat or as complex as handling child custody matters while the couple works out the financial split, or the lawyer drafts a qualified domestic relations order and the divorcing couple handles the of rest the case.Looking into unbundled services responds to the proliferation of pro se litigants in family cases, particularly divorce, and the Bar needs to consider unbundled legal services to accommodate the needs of people who use the system, Koch said.“Pro se litigants are a majority of our customers in the divorce arena and we have to be responsive to them,” Koch said. “What we have been faced with is how do we respond to that need, both to the people who don’t have lawyers and to make sure that legal rights and representation are provided when needed.”Looking at the pro se problems is a balancing act, he said.“We can’t go into this with the sole perspective of protecting lawyers’ pocketbooks, but we have got to also recognize that things are changing within the family law division and we have to meet those needs,” Koch said.As it now stands, Koch said, providing limited representation is not precluded by Bar rules, “it is simply that there are all kinds of problems related to it.”Is it ethical for a lawyer to involve himself or herself only in a limited portion of a case? From a legal malpractice perspective, what is the response from the insurance carrier about limited representation? Will judges permit lawyers to take part in one aspect of a case and not another?“Most judges take the position, and I think reasonably so, that if you are on this case, you are on this case,” Koch said. “It is not like you are kind of pregnant — you are either on or off.”Bar Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Tarbert said the Supreme Court has generally declined to adopt rules that apply only to lawyers in a specific practice area. In 1969, Tarbert said, the court rejected a rule intended to govern the conduct of in-house counsel for insurance companies. More recently, Tarbert said, the court declined to adopt a rule that would address the conduct of family law practitioners.“Specifically, the court said `the petitioners have not demonstrated that there is a need to treat those members of the Bar who practice family law differently than other members of the Bar,’” Tarbert said, citing Amendment to Rules Regulating the Florida Bar — Rule 4-1.18, Client-Lawyer Relationships in Family Law Matters, 662 So. 2d 1246 (Fla. 1995).Tarbert said the Professional Ethics Committee has followed the court’s general precept. As an example, the panel published Florida Ethics Opinion 90-4, which indicated the rule prohibiting communication with represented persons applies to Department of Justice attorneys when the DOJ argued otherwise.“Florida was at the vanguard of states that declared that DOJ attorneys could not just try to exempt themselves from state rules,” Tarbert said.Tarbert said there is now only one rule approved by the Supreme Court which specifically addresses one type of practitioner — Rule 4-3.8, Special Responsibilities of a Prosecutor, which deals with the conduct of prosecutors in criminal cases.Colorado’s new limited representation rules went into effect last July.“Colorado lawyers and judges supported the idea that some lawyer help to pro se parties is better than none,” Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Mullarkey told that state’s Judicial Conference last year.“The rules are meant to achieve candor to the court and to allow citizens to obtain legal services without having to hire an attorney for the entire litigation or go without.”The rules require a pro se party to disclose on the pleading the name of the attorney who assisted in drafting the pleading. An attorney must advise the pro se party of that requirement and also to explain the risk involved in obtaining limited representation in contrast to full representation in litigation. Under the revised civil rules, limited representation by an attorney does not constitute an entry of appearance, and the court and opposing parties are not required to serve the assisting attorney.The Colorado rules also provide:The attorney/client privilege applies to limited representation as it does to full representation under the ethical rules.The appearance of the attorney’s name on the pro se pleading is not the occasion for other parties or the court to question the assisting attorney regarding the case or the actions of the pro se party.The rules do not contemplate the opposing party questioning the pro se party about the preparation of the pleading or inquiring into or discovering the attorney’s versus the client’s own drafts of the pleading.If the matter of sanctions should arise because the client did not disclose the name of the attorney, or the attorney did not advise the client to make the disclosure, the matter should be handled by the court apart from the merits of the pro se party’s case and include confidential in-camera treatment of papers, conversations or other matters that implicate the attorney/client privilege.“Whether these rules will function as intended depends on the willingness of bench and bar to have them work,” Justice Mullarkey said.Koch noted Arizona also has similar unbundled legal services rules; however, it is difficult to compare the Arizona and Colorado experiences to Florida because Arizona’s rules differ sharply from Florida’s, and Colorado’s rules have been in place for less than two years.“In Arizona when pro se litigants come in, they have people at a desk that answer questions, and if there is a feature of their case these pro se litigants need assistance with they have a list of lawyers who will assist them — on an unbundled basis — as to particular topics,” Koch said, noting, too, that Arizona has no UPL rules.Anyone interested in serving on the committee or providing comments to the panel may contact The Florida Bar, Office of the Executive Director, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300.last_img

Major pension funds call for G20 regulation on climate disclosure

first_imgNational regulation requiring disclosure of material climate risks should be a priority for the G20, according to major European and US pension funds and other institutional investors with more than $13trn (€11.5trn) in assets under management. The recommendation is one of several that the group of investors, which include the $293bn California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and major European asset owners such as the Swedish buffer funds, €183bn Dutch asset manager PGGM and the UK’s £50bn (€68bn) Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS), have set out in a climate change-focused letter to the governments of the world’s 20 largest economies (G20).Citing the landmark agreement reached at the UN climate change conference (COP21) in Paris in December 2015, the investors said that significant investment is needed to achieve the goals of the Paris agreement and that governments “have a responsibility to work with the private sector” to ensure this is catalysed.To that end, according to the investor group, the G20 should, among other steps, “prioritise rulemaking by national financial regulators to require disclosure of material climate risks”. They cited the work being done by the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure (TCFD) of the Financial Stability Board (FSB), and asked the G20 to consider the task force’s recommendations, due in December 2016, “as inputs towards any rulemaking” by national financial regulators.The TCFD is developing a framework for voluntary climate-related financial disclosure by companies, and is due to present a final report for consultation by the end of December.In their letter, the investors also called for the G20 to “support a doubling of global investment in clean energy by 2020”, saying the private sector needs policy support to achieve this goal, and for the governments to implement previously issued investor recommendations for action such as the introduction of “stable, reliable and economically meaningful carbon pricing” and the phasing out of subsidies for fossil fuels.The letter, which was co-sponsored by investor organisations such as the UN-backed Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) and the Institutional Investor Network on Climate Change (IIGCC), comes in the lead-up to a summit of G20 leaders in Hangzhou, China, in early September.The investors also want to see “green finance” on the agenda of the summit, specifically conclusions drawn by the G20’s green finance study group.“We request that the green finance agenda be taken forward by future G20 presidencies,” the letter states.It comes after the UK’s Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (IFoA) earlier this week announced it has signed a letter to the G20, urging the governments to phase out fossil fuel subsidies.last_img read more

Spaceship-like Coast house passes in at cryptocurrency auction

first_imgThe house at 1 Beech Lane, Casuarina passed in at its cryptocurrency auction earlier this week.A Coast home that looks more like a spaceship than a house has been offered to buyers in a fashion befitting of its futuristic aesthetic.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:36Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenThis home is being auctioned in Bitcoin!00:36The beachfront Casuarina house, which has an unusual design and appears to defy gravity, went under the hammer earlier this week, and some registered buyers bid with Bitcoin.Marketing agents Nick and Carol Witheriff, of LJ Hooker Kingscliff, claim it was one of the world’s first live streamed cryptocurrency auctions.Its design makes it look more like a spaceship than a house.More than 200 people squeezed into the property to watch the auction unfold.There were six registered bidders vying for the property.While it was passed in at $3.4 million — or 457 Bitcoin — Mr Witheriff said he was negotiating its sale with two parties.“We’ve got two groups, one (offering) Bitcoin and one cash,” he said.“We’re negotiating at the moment.”Mr Witheriff said the Bitcoin buyer was from Melbourne while the cash buyer was a company hoping to make the house a prize home.There were six registered buyers on the day with bidding starting at $1.5 million — or 205 Bitcoin.“There was one registered on the live stream but they didn’t place a bid,” Mr Witheriff said.“Bidding was taken in both cash and Bitcoin.“We had a live screen and it converted the Australian dollars into Bitcoin (and vice versa).”He said more than 200 people gathered to watch the auction unfold.MORE NEWS: Home of skating icons who gave away $500k hits marketMORE NEWS: Why real estate often resists economic downturnsMore from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa12 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoBuyers bid with both cash and cryptocurrency.The agent is negotiating with two potential buyers.It’s certainly different from any other property on the street.“Normally at an auction, we see around about 20 to 30 people show up,” he said.“In this case, on a Monday we had 200 people present at the auction.“The sheer interest was large because of the concept being different but also the home — it’s such a wow home.“We’ve never seen anything like this built in the suburb.”The property, aptly named “The Jetsons”, was designed to push the boundaries of architecture.Its second level balances on top of the ground floor at a terrifying angle, making it look like it could topple at any moment.Owner and designer Greg Costello told the Bulletin when the house hit the market in August, that its daring design was what made it so impressive.“There’s over 80 tonnes of weight (hanging) there,” he said.But he was quick to assure the top level was not at risk of falling, explaining the structure was “anchored to the earth”.jessica.brown@news.com.auVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:44Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow to bid at auction for your dream home? 01:45last_img read more

Beware robo-scam calls

first_imgStatewide—You get a call from an unknown number. You let it go to voicemail and then you hear this message, “Hello we are going to charge you as per your request direct debit from your bank account for disputed or cancel please call us on our toll-free number 833-466-9218. I repeat again 833466921 and talk to our expert customer care or else you will be charged this year subscription. Thank you.”Now what? Well before you panic, this is a fake “your anti-virus subscription will be auto-renewed” scam by criminals robo-dialing. The scam begins with a pre-recorded stiff robotic person. This scam bait message is designed to lure you to respond back and tell the scammer that you are not aware of the fake anti-virus subscription and you need a refund.Never give an unknown caller your credit card number or Social Security number. Companies who already have your information may ask for the last four digits for verification. Some scammers ask for your bank account and routing number or ask you to wire transfer them a payment, giving a fake explanation that they cannot accept a credit card or personal check. This is an instant scammer alert because scammers can withdraw money if they know your bank account and routing number (e.g. counterfeit cashed checks) and illegal wire transfers are far less traceable than unauthorized credit card charges.last_img read more

Pretty Polly option for Stack filly

first_imgTommy Stack’s Ribblesdale absentee Alive Alive Oh may take in the Oxigen Environmental Pretty Polly Stakes on the way to the Darley Irish Oaks. Forecast to go off favourite for the Group Two at Royal Ascot on Thursday, connections considered the ground to be too quick for the daughter of Duke Of Marmalade. With the Oaks at the Curragh on July 20 as her main mid-summer target, her team will wait to see how she takes the exertions of travelling back to Ireland before deciding her exact plan. Press Associationcenter_img “We’ll just have a think about it and see how she is when we get home,” said Stack’s son and assistant, Fozzy. “I’m not sure if she’ll go straight to the Oaks, she might run in the Pretty Polly (Curragh, June 30) first. “It’s a shame for everyone she isn’t running at Ascot, we thought they’d get a shower or two but there’s been nothing. They had some nearby but nothing on the track. “It was just a shade too quick for her.” last_img read more