Feel Good Fridays – Sea Bags

first_img 10 Best Whiskies for Irish Coffee The 12 Best Laptop Bags for Men Rumpl NanoLoft Puffy Blanket is Made Entirely Out of Recycled Material Summer is wrapping up but we can be reminded of our salty sailing expeditions all year round when we tote around bags from Sea Bags. The company has been creating bags and accessories from reclaimed sailcloth in the historic Old Port district of Portland, Maine since 1999. Today they have a wide assortment of not just duffles and tote bags but wine totes (hello!), iPad cases, dog bowls and shaving cases. All the sails have been used in the past so markings, weathering and various stamps and stripes are part of their charm.Seabags has collaborated with many different companies but recently they worked with a great charity, Gulf of Maine Research Institute to create a limited edition tote bag and bucket bag. Fifty percent of every bag purchased will benefit GMRI’s scientific research around the sustainability of our natural resources and working waterfronts.“Commitment to community has always been a cornerstone to our business model,” said Beth Shissler, President of Sea Bags. “This project underscores the broad sense of community around our largest natural resource and our traditional working waterfronts. And GMRI’s mission nicely complements our company’s commitment to sustainable practices.”The special design features interconnecting bright green and vibrant blue waves – made from recycled spinnaker – wrapped around the white Dacron bag. Each bag is unique. Inside the large tote (14″ h x 18″) there is a hanging zip pocket in additional to the typical slip pocket located between the rope handles. The bucket bag is 9.5″h x 7″w and hangs by a rope handle knotted through grommets.Even though beach days are over, these are great weekend bags, grocery bags (eco-shopping bro!) or even a laundry bag at school. And take note all you boat owners, send in your sails and they will make you a bag. Now that’s sailing sustainability! Editors’ Recommendations It’s Time to Ditch Your Sleeping Bag for a Versatile, Lightweight Camping Quilt Hardworking Gentlemen Offers American-Made Grooming Goods for the Everyday Manlast_img read more

Sherritt fined 1 million for coal mine discharges under the Fisheries Act

CALGARY — The second coal-mining company in four months is being hit with a six-figure penalty for polluting incidents that impacted fish in tributaries of the Athabasca River east of Jasper National Park in Alberta.On Tuesday, Sherritt International Corp. (TSX:S) agreed to pay a fine of $1 million after pleading guilty in provincial court to three counts under the federal Fisheries Act.The Toronto-based company was charged five years ago due to incidents where wastewater considered harmful to fish was allowed to flow from its open pit Coal Valley Mine about 120 kilometres east of Jasper National Park into ecologically significant habitat for rainbow trout.In June, Prairie Mines & Royalty Ltd. — formerly known as Coal Valley Resources — was handed almost $4.5 million in federal and provincial penalties after it also pleaded guilty to polluting tributaries of the Athabasca River.Prairie Mines was charged after a catastrophic break in an earthen berm at its Obed Mountain coal mine about 50 kilometres east of the park allowed an estimated 670 million litres of waste water to escape into the river system in October 2013.Environment and Climate Change Canada said Tuesday the Sherritt charges were laid following an inspection in August 2012 of the coal mine located about 90 kilometres south of the town of Edson.The discharges were ordered halted but the ministry subsequently discovered that two other discharges had occurred in 2011.“The waste water ponds at the Coal Valley Mine collected surface water that was treated with a chemical flocculant to remove suspended sediment before being discharged,” it said in a news release.“Both suspended sediment and an excess of flocculant can be toxic to fish.”Most of the $1-million fine is to be assigned to the ministry’s environmental damages fund to be directed to programs intended to benefit the natural environment.Sherritt investor relations director Joe Racanelli said the company installed new sediment control systems and initiated better management practices after the charges were laid.He said the company is taking responsibility for the discharges even though it sold the coal mine in 2014.“We do not own the Coal Valley Mine but we were operators and owners at the time so we are responsible because there was a non-compliance issue. Sherritt takes these kinds of issues very seriously,” he said.He wouldn’t comment when asked if the amount of the fine was negotiated in return for the guilty plea.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter. read more