More sports in brief

first_imgSpurs extend home dominance SAN ANTONIO (AP): San Antonio immediately bounced back from a rare loss and beat Denver 101-86 on Saturday to extend their franchise record for consecutive home wins to 26. Kawhi Leonard had 20 points for the Spurs, who maintained their eight-game lead atop the NBA’s Southwest Division. San Antonio’s LaMarcus Aldridge had 12 points and nine rebounds, and Boris Diaw had 16 points for the Spurs, who have won all 17 home games this season to add to the final nine of the previous campaign. Denver’s Nikola Jokic scored 22 points on 10-for-19 shooting. Shah banned after failing doping test ISLAMABAD (AP): The International Cricket Council has provisionally suspended Pakistan leg-spinner Yasir Shah for a positive drug test. The ICC says in a statement yesterday that a sample provided by Shah on Nov. 13, when Pakistan played an ODI against England in the United Arab Emirates, contained chlortalidone, which is on the World Anti-Doping Authority’s list of prohibited substances. Shah could challenge the suspension and apply for the test of his B sample within seven days. The 29-year-old Shah has taken 76 wickets in 12 Test matches and 18 wickets in 15 one-day internationals.last_img read more

The Ebola Story

first_imgThe sky was the color of ink and the clouds were rumbling as with the voice of a god straining against his bonds. Clearly, a heavy downpour was threatening and perhaps when it came the impact would be severe. In the large Guinean town of Guékédou, some hundreds of kilometers from the Liberian-Guinean border, a huge crowd was heading down a dirt road and toward the local MSF hospital. All medical assistances offered by the establishment, as far as anyone could remember, were free of charge and nobody had ever had any grievances against the hospital — at least not were it was concerned. Unfortunately, only a few days ago things had taken a different turn. Already there was talk of ransacking the hospital offices, manhandling its staff members and possibly even burning down the building. Bearing machetes, clubs and gasoline, which could perhaps aid in starting a fire, the crowd of men and women made their way toward the hospital, their mood foreshadowing the clouds overhead. The eating of fruits bats had always been a local delicacy, could be traced to decades of years back when the practice had first taken root among the inhabitants of some Guinean towns and hamlets, and had never been a cause for concern; especially since it had never been associated with death or illness, let alone one which nobody could explain. Suddenly disaster struck. Somewhere in a village in Guékédou, a child had died of unexplained causes. Soon after the entire family took ill and passed on as well. A member of the family had been taken to the MSF hospital and, after careful medical examination it was revealed that the relative had died of the Ebola virus, which in 1976 had broken out in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It was unacceptable. Here was a practice entrenched by years of acceptance and perhaps as old as the ancestors. Now it was to be viewed with suspicion and perhaps renounced altogether. Pointing accusing fingers at the staff of the MSF hospital and thinking that perhaps they could be held responsible for a mysterious illness which until then had never been known in Guinea, the surging, angry mass of men and women, approached the hospital, shouting at the top of their voices: Soon the crowd was ransacking the hospital offices; within a few moments the building was engulfed in flames. Fortunately, the hospital staff had already fled, rescued and taken to a local military base by gendarmes who had been sent to quell the riot. The actions of the multitude were, however, hardly a remedy for the situation, let alone the proper avenue through which the people could vent their frustration. Besides, there was as yet no cure for Ebola. A person who contracted the virus had no choice other than to consider himself as good as dead. In the weeks that were to follow, more and more cases would be reported in Guinea, flowing over its borders and beyond.In neighboring Liberia health officials and government people were taking little or no precautionary measures. To many of the clinics and hospitals in the interior parts of the country, especially those close to border areas, nobody had seen the foresight to distribute protective clothing, which perhaps could have gone a long way in preventing aid workers from contracting the virus. Some of the nurses and doctors hadn’t even heard of Ebola, and least did they know about the dangers associated with handling suspected Ebola patients. The aid organizations themselves, including the Government of Liberia (GoL), were making only half-hearted efforts to bring the situation under control — at least until it became clear that Liberia also had an Ebola outbreak. What was even more disturbing was the fact that despite reports of suspected Ebola cases having entered the country, the local NGOs and GoL were still shuffling their feet. Before long, cases would be reported not only in the interior parts of the Liberia but in the city also. And in the swirling mass of confusion which would follow, the response from the government would at best be inefficient and, at worst, utterly shameful. To quarantine suspected Ebola patients, the Liberian government would select none other than a public school located within the city’s largest slum. The residents seeing themselves as scapegoats and no more informed about Ebola than many people in the country, would resort to mob justice. Several people would get in physical contact with the alleged Ebola patients. Quarantining the whole slum community would be put into effect. Police and soldiers would be sent to suppress the riot. Gunshots would be fired, leading to the loss of life of two people. Before then, however, for many Liberian border officials it was business as usual. At Liberia’s various border points immigration people, dressed in desert fatigues, were going about their normal affairs and, while playing the professional, having traders pour oil into their palms. By then Ivory Coast had responded swiftly, closing its boundaries with both Guinea and Liberia. Musa Kamara was one of several Guinean peanut farmers who sold their produce into neighboring Liberia, traveling hundreds of kilometers and along mostly unpaved roads. Usually the trip took two days only. By dusk you were to arrive in Nzérékoré and the following day to continue the journey to the Liberian-Guinean border. Unfortunately for Kamara, it had taken him three days just to reach Nzérékoré because the rickety passenger bus in which he was travelling had got stuck in a particularly muddy road along the Guékédou highway. Along with the other passengers with whom he was travelling he had stood for hours by the roadside, waiting expectantly as the bus driver and his carboys, their muscles stretched to breaking point, made whatever efforts they could to get the vehicle out of the mire. Although the waiting had been prolonged so much as to be almost unnerving, it could hardly be compared to the strange sensation which now he was feeling. Already his forehead had broken out in cold sweat. But being usually a man who did not easily give in to weakness, he made the journey to Nzérékoré and, to his surprise, was feeling as sound in health as ever. Thus the next morning, having with his bags of groundnuts boarded a bus travelling to the Liberian-Guinean border, he was one of several traders entering Liberia at dusk. It was there that the illness, which he had all along suspected on the road from Guékédou, again showed its ugly head. He had no sooner unloaded his peanut-bags than he collapsed, trembling and sweating profusely. Patience Dorbor had for four years worked as a nurse at a local clinic in the Foyah region. Her specialized training she had had at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Hospital and had graduated with a degree from the Tubman National Institute of Medical Arts (TNIMA). Although working at JFK had been exhausting and despite the fact that she received a salary which was a little more than ex-gratia, she relished every moment of the experience. Then she got an employment opportunity from a hospital in Lofa County; the salary was much better. Besides, she would be closer to her siblings. It was at this very hospital in which Patience was working that early one evening a Guinean trader was brought in for medical treatment. The man’s name was Musa Kamara. And he was gravely ill. From his nose, eyes and mouth blood was pouring profusely. It was unlike anything Patience had seen before. But being a trained nurse dedicated to her work, immediately she began attending to the patient. With her were a few other nurses, including a doctor. As they attended the trader, most of the nurses, including Patience herself, wore no protective clothing and most of them had not even surgical gloves to wear because there was a severe shortage of them in the hospital; they had no choice other than to administer the task barehanded. However, the trader died two days later. A day following the incident Patience boarded a bus and headed for Monrovia, feeling strangely ill. Her mother had sent her a phone call pleading with her to abandon the border hospital without delay; explaining that a virus known as Ebola had just broken out in Guinea; that it was possible it had made its way into Liberia already. That was the first time Patience had ever heard of the Ebola virus. Yet when she arrived in Monrovia she collapsed in sweat and exhaustion. As he made his way into the Springs Field airport terminal and sat in one of the plastic seating, he felt slightly ill. Folding his arms across his chest and in an effort to stifle the occasional chill which was making him tremble, he looked impassively at the small crowd of people sitting with him. He didn’t know anyone among them and wasn’t even interested. Besides, he had his own troubles — this illness which had come upon him so suddenly and unexpectedly that he barely had the time to go for a medical checkup. Anyhow he was traveling and perhaps when the plane landed he would go for an examination directly. To the casual observers sitting along with him in the airport, the ailing man seemed as sound in health as any one of them; just an ordinary fellow awaiting a plane which would take him thousands of miles to Lagos. The man was Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian Ministry of Finance employee who for some reason was making this trip to Nigeria. Sitting with his arms clasped to his chest, Sawyer tried to revolve in his mind the incidents of the days earlier. He had two days before arrived at the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital, along with a sister who had fallen gravely ill. The poor woman was drenched in sweat and there was blood oozing from her eyes and nostrils. Holding her in his arms and having already got himself smeared with the blood of his ailing sister, Sawyer looked down in her face and wondered what had happened to her. Like most people in Monrovia, Patrick Sawyer had heard of the Ebola virus, which had broken out in Guinea and Sierra Leone and possibly in Liberia even. But to him this just didn’t seem possible, especially since the woman in his arms was no one other than his sister. And although the question of where she could have contracted the virus rang in his ears as if in an echo chamber, he just wasn’t willing to listen. When he was told by hospital staff that had grown suspicious of his close physical contact with the ailing woman to go for medical checkup immediately, Sawyer flew into a rage, thinking that perhaps they thought he had contracted Ebola as well. Shouting at the hospital attendants, he got into his private vehicle and drove off. Now here he was, feeling only slightly better than the ailing sister whom he had accompanied to the hospital a few days earlier. Could it be that he had contracted Ebola? he wondered. The gorgeous Ghanaian plane hostess, smiling broadly, greeted Patrick Sawyer as he made his way into the passenger aircraft, dressed in warm clothing and yet hugging himself. “Hello,” said Sawyer, his voice barely above a whisper, and having smiled back at the hostess, shuffled down the aisle between the seats and sat down. Beads of cold sweat were streaming down his face; the chill which he had felt a few moments earlier had got only worse.A few hours later, the passenger plane having arrived in Lagos, Patrick Sawyer got off and made his way into a Nigerian airport terminal. He was hardly out of the airport than the man who would be known as the “mad Ebola terrorist” fell down and lost consciousness.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Silence of religious leaders?

first_imgDear Editor,Please allow me space in your publication to seek some clarity for my own benefit and for the benefit of those like me who find themselves being confused by the silence of some of our religious leaders in our society.I was raised in a Christian home and attended church regularly. I still do so now. I remember over the early 2000s and up to 2015 hearing many sermons by different pastors, prophets and even bishops and insertions in sermons of the perceived evils that prevailed in our lands. I remember hearing that it is an obligation of these preachers to speak against perceived evil. I also remember hearing prophecies just before both the 2011 and 2015 elections about the leaders and persons God had anointed to lead our land and that these leaders were prophesied to be righteous. We all remember that “this is the day that the Lord has made” said at the inauguration.I as a young Christian am now in a state of confusion as to the silence from these very pastors, prophets and bishops. We have seen over the past three years this “righteous government” being accused of some of the most blatant abuse of power and the rights of the people of Guyana yet not a word is being spoken for or against these acts.I will now list a few of the accusations and request a response from these prophets, pastors and bishops on their views of the actions of the Government: I refer, Editor, to the dismissal of the 2000 Amerindians shortly after taking office; the closing down of the sugar estates and dismissal of 7000 or more workers in that industry; the arrangement of the rental of the “Drug Bond” where one of their supporters, we were recently told, received more than a quarter billion dollars without investing a dollar of his own money; the continual issuing of contracts to friends without adhering to the tendering process; the ignoring of the Constitution with regard to the established process that was accepted by all and which they themselves subscribed to over the years.My confusion is as a result of the silence in the face of the above stated accusations which on the face of it seems founded in truth. My question to these leaders is simple. Is it okay for one government to do wrong to Guyanese and/or a set of Guyanese?Is it that we are to accept that God accepts wrong from some people and not from others?Do we have some Guyanese who are considered ‘God’s chosen people’? What am I to understand by your silence?Confused Christianlast_img read more

FIBA-Africa Promises Solution in Basketball Leadership Crisis

first_imgThe continental governing body of basketball, FIBA-Africa has vowed to offer requisite provisions that would lead to finding a “Relevant Solution” in the leadership crisis of the Liberia Basketball Association (LBA).The Secretary General of FIBA-Africa, Alphonse Bile, in his response dated April 8, to Deputy Sports Minister Henry B. Yonton, Jr., said the letter requesting FIBA-Africa’s intervention was “well received.”“FIBA Africa notes and would like to commend you (for their) implication to solve this conflict,” the letter said. “Be sure that some provisions shall be made to find a relevant solution to this situation.”Mr. Bile, in his communication, further said FIBA-Africa would also solicit a “common effort” from the Ministry of Youth and Sports to find a way-out in basketball conflict, which erupted since January-2015.FIBA-Africa is a zone within the International Basketball Federation (FIBA), which contains all 53 national African FIBA federations. It was founded in 1961. FIBA Africa maintains offices in Cairo and in Abidjan.FIBA Africa’s letter was a reply owing to a two-page letter of complaint from the Deputy Sports Minister on behalf of the Liberian government.In his communication dated 3 April, the Deputy Sports Minister informed FIBA-Africa regarding the ongoing stalemate in the LBA, which he said began over the last three months owing to the unremitting contestation for “legitimacy and expiration of tenure” by some aggrieved members, structured under the named: “Liberia Basketball Presidents Association.”Deputy Sports Minister Yonton said the aggrieved stakeholders raised five issues, which include: the violation of the constitution of the LBA by Mr. Rufus Anderson, President of the LBA for not holding election the fourth year of his term and make his administration illegitimate and that club(s) that didn’t participate in the immediate past organized basketball season should not be eligible for the forthcoming congress.Others include that the leadership published listing of teams eligible for congress and excludes teams that didn’t participate in the league.On the aggrieved members’ argument, the LBA leadership recounted the Ebola outbreak in the country, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the elections to elect the corps of officers for the LBA could not be held in 2014; that some of the contestants seeking positions are not eligible to participate as pursuant to constitutional requirements and the leadership has not abrogated the constitution.“To further calm the stalemate, the Liberia National Olympic Committee was written by the aggrieved party to intervene in the dispute. Despite efforts by the arbitration committee of the LNOC to ensure that peace and harmony is restored, this effort was unsuccessful,” the Ministry said.However, prior to the intervention letter of FIBA-Africa, the Youth and Sports Ministry suspended the activities of basketball.In the April 1’s communication to the LBA Yonton mandated the LBA to halt its elections, scheduled for Tuesday, April 7, and urged the leadership to allow the intervention of FIBA to resolve the current leadership crisis.Yonton wrote: “Owing to the continuous contest between the leaders of the LBA and the aggrieved party, regarding its legitimacy, the Ministry has reached a decision to seek the intervention of the Africa basketball governing body – FIBA-Africa with offices in Abidjan and Cairo.”Yonton’s communication further told outgoing LBA president Rufus Anderson, to “adjourn all processes pertaining to the holding of election and advise further that you stay clear-off all basketball activities until further consultation with FIBA-Africa is concluded.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Enmore businesses recognise top student

first_imgSeveral business establishments in Enmore, East Coast Demerara on Saturday last hailed the achievements of a young son of that soil who excelled at the National Grade Six Assessment (NGSA) examinations for 2017.Balram Harrichand, a former student of Valmiki Vidlaya Primary at Lusignan, EastBalram Harrichand being recognised and honoured by his fellow villagersCoast Demerara, chalked up a whopping 516 marks out of a possible 529, gaining a spot at Queen’s College.He emerged top student of that primary school, while also placing in the top 10 of Region Four, and 42nd overall in the country.His father, Tularam Sharma Harrichand, popularly known as ‘Pandit Hero’, has said he is very happy with his son’s performance. He noted that all the long hours of studies are paying off.Last Saturday, the young Harrichand received several trophies to mark his achievement, with Motor Trend Auto Spares and Repairs, Star Sports, Trans Pacific Motor Spares, Rajin Auto Paint, and S.E Auto Sales making presentations.The aspiring engineer, expressing his gratitude for the acknowledgement from his fellow villagers, pointed out that such levels of encouragement can only serve to motivate him to seek higher academic excellence.Managing Director of Star Sports, Sheik Mohamed, who is a former national wicketkeeper/batsman, urged the student to work diligently to achieve his goals and make the community proud.Starlet Cup race car champion driver Motilall ‘Kevin’ Deodass, of Motor Trend Auto Spares and Repairs, and Rajin Ramdeo of Rajin Auto Paint also offered words of encouragement, stating that young Balram is an example of what could be achieved through hard work, dedication and commitment.last_img read more

Meissner wins Four Continents title, rallying from sixth

first_imgKimmie Meissner won the Four Continents women’s title Saturday, rallying from sixthplace in the free skate in Colorado Springs, Colo. Upset with her performance in the short program Thursday, Meissner made up more than four points on Joannie Rochette of Canada, who ended up third. Emily Hughes was second after a personal-best international performance in the freeskate. As Meissner stood on the ice before the start of her program, the U.S. champion told herself it was only a few points. She even used Evan Lysacek as motivation. He made up more than 10points in the free skate the night before to win the men’s program. “I like my program and I practice it every day, so I just wanted to do it,” Meissner said. “I definitely felt more determined. I was a little angry.” The men’s downhill race at the World Championships in Are, Sweden, was postponed Saturday due to thick fog. The race is scheduled to be run today, along with the women’s downhill. Ireen Wust broke twotrack records to take control of the women’s World Allround Speedskating Championships in Heerenveen, Netherlands. Dutchman Sven Kramer maintained his lead in the men’s standings despite a disappointing sixth-place finish in the 1,500. Steven Holcomb of the United States and Ivo Rueegg of Switzerland tied for firstplace in a two-man bobsled World Cup race in Cesana, Italy. TRACK AND FIELD: Yelena Isinbayeva broke her own indoor mark in the women’s pole vault in Donetsk, Ukraine, clearing 16 feet, 2 inches for her 20th world record. The Olympic and world champion bettered her previous record of 16-1 , set at this meet last year. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Things To Do

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card Barry Diamond and Kira Soltanivich will perform, 9 p.m. today and Saturday at J.R.’s Comedy Club located inside Marie Callender’s at 27630 The Old Road, Valencia. Cost: $12, or $22.99 for dinner and the show. Call (661) 259-2291 or visit www.comedyinvalencia.com. Sierra Club hike up Trail Canyon to the falls, 9 a.m. Saturday at the entrance to Towsley Canyon Park, 24255 The Old Road, Newhall. Call Dave Morrow at (661) 254-5245. Family Nature Walk, 11 a.m.-noon, and an animal presentation, 1-2 p.m. every Saturday at Placerita Canyon Park and Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” will be presented, 2 p.m. Saturdays and 6:30 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 26 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $8-$13. Call (661) 799-2702. Western Music Concert will feature The Messick Family Band and cowboy poet J.D. Seibert, 7 p.m. Saturday in Hart Hall at William S. Hart Park, 24151 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Call (661) 254-4584. Barry Diamond and Kira Soltanivich will perform, 9 p.m. today and Saturday at J.R.’s Comedy Club located inside Marie Callender’s at 27630 The Old Road, Valencia. Cost: $12, or $22.99 for dinner and the show. Call (661) 259-2291 or visit www.comedyinvalencia.com. Sierra Club hike up Trail Canyon to the falls, 9 a.m. Saturday at the entrance to Towsley Canyon Park, 24255 The Old Road, Newhall. Call Dave Morrow at (661) 254-5245. Family Nature Walk, 11 a.m.-noon, and an animal presentation, 1-2 p.m. every Saturday at Placerita Canyon Park and Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” will be presented, 2 p.m. Saturdays and 6:30 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 26 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $8-$13. Call (661) 799-2702. Western Music Concert will feature The Messick Family Band and cowboy poet J.D. Seibert, 7 p.m. Saturday in Hart Hall at William S. Hart Park, 24151 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Call (661) 254-4584. Grateful Dudes perform bluegrass music, 7:30-10:30 p.m. every Saturday at Vincenzo’s, 24504 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6733. Skinny Little Twits will perform original and classic rock music, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday at the Saugus Swapmeet at Saugus Speedway, 22500 Soledad Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 259-3886. Live Bird of Prey presentation, 11 a.m. Sunday at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area, 10700 W. Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 268-0840. Ranger-led nature hike, 11 a.m. the second, third and fourth Sundays of each month at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area, 10700 W. Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 268-0840. Canyon High School Band Department will present a dinner concert, 7 p.m. Tuesday in the multipurpose room at La Mesa Junior High, 26623 May Way, Canyon Country. Tickets: $10. Call (661) 252-6110. Senior Cinema will present “Pride and Prejudice” starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson, 2 p.m. Wednesday at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Cost: $1. Call (661) 259-9444. Movies to Talk About will feature two locally made short films, “The Wash” and “One Paycheck Away,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday at Vincenzo’s Pizza, 24504 1/2 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Admission is free. Visit www.UUofSCV.org. To submit an event for the Things To Do calendar, contact Sharon Cotal two weeks prior to the event at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Grateful Dudes perform bluegrass music, 7:30-10:30 p.m. every Saturday at Vincenzo’s, 24504 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6733. Skinny Little Twits will perform original and classic rock music, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday at the Saugus Swapmeet at Saugus Speedway, 22500 Soledad Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 259-3886. Live Bird of Prey presentation, 11 a.m. Sunday at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area, 10700 W. Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 268-0840. Ranger-led nature hike, 11 a.m. the second, third and fourth Sundays of each month at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area, 10700 W. Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 268-0840. Canyon High School Band Department will present a dinner concert, 7 p.m. Tuesday in the multipurpose room at La Mesa Junior High, 26623 May Way, Canyon Country. Tickets: $10. Call (661) 252-6110. Senior Cinema will present “Pride and Prejudice” starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson, 2 p.m. Wednesday at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Cost: $1. Call (661) 259-9444. Movies to Talk About will feature two locally made short films, “The Wash” and “One Paycheck Away,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday at Vincenzo’s Pizza, 24504 1/2 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Admission is free. Visit www.UUofSCV.org. To submit an event for the Things To Do calendar, contact Sharon Cotal two weeks prior to the event at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!,“The Skin of our Teeth” will be presented, 7 p.m. today and Saturday in the Hart High School auditorium, 24825 N. Newhall Ave., Newhall. Tickets: $8 at the door. Call (661) 259-7575, Ext. 212. Care For Your Heart Health Fair will offer free screenings and education about the risk of heart disease, 2-4 p.m. today at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, 23845 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call Victoriana Donnelly at (661) 253-8761. “To Kill a Mockingbird” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 26 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $8-$13. Call (661) 799-2702. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 18 at the Repertory East Playhouse, 24266 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 288-0000. “The Skin of our Teeth” will be presented, 7 p.m. today and Saturday in the Hart High School auditorium, 24825 N. Newhall Ave., Newhall. Tickets: $8 at the door. Call (661) 259-7575, Ext. 212. Care For Your Heart Health Fair will offer free screenings and education about the risk of heart disease, 2-4 p.m. today at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, 23845 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call Victoriana Donnelly at (661) 253-8761. “To Kill a Mockingbird” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 26 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $8-$13. Call (661) 799-2702. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 18 at the Repertory East Playhouse, 24266 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 288-0000. last_img read more

TERMON U13’S FACE ST.EUNAN’S IN COUNTY FINAL AFTER DEFEATING KILLYBEGS

first_imgAfter being pipped by a point in last weeks Northern board final , Termon U13’s bounced back with a hard earned victory over the the Southern board champions, to edge out Killybegs in a thrilling contest in Glenfin on Saturday last. A gifted and physically strong Killybegs side made it clear they meant business , but the intensity and drive of the Termon lads allied to some quality football ensured they edged the first half.Klllybegs started strongly after half time , and only for some stalwart defending by Bobby Mc Gettigan and Marty Steele, they could easily have added to the their three goal tally and won the game .With Jamie Grant and Conor Black always available Termon managed to settle the ship and grab a few key scores to stay in front but as the full time whistle beckoned Killybegs rallied again. In a pulsating contest which ebbed and flowed over the hour , Conor Mc Fadden and Ryan Mc Fadden initially controlled enough supply of ball to allow Termon keep their noses in front while the unyielding defence stood strong and created a platform for success. Once again it was a triumph of the collective over the individual , and manager PJ Mc Fadden credited the work ethos and collective spirit as the key to the Termon victory.As a team they were a complete unit , but special mention must go to Bobby Mc Gettigan who won a key battle with a talented Killybegs full forward , and half forward Conor Black who provided an outlet and launch pad for Termon throughout the hour. In addition Ryan Mc Fadden was the perfect linkman to feed a Termon team who seemed determined to work as a unit to ensure team success and they were full value for their win.When speaking of their pride in the boys performance , managers PJ & Andy Mc Fadden were keen to emphasise that the boys had played brilliantly to date, but that the job was not yet done. They maintain that they have always believed their group of players deserve to be playing in the county finals and look forward to testing themselves against the best in the county next weekend. While acknowledging that St Euanans are red hot favourites, they believe their team have the ability to rise to the occasion and spring a surprise .If it replicates previous games, another thriller may be in store .It should be an interesting game , be there if you can …… Donegal Football is in safe hands if we can build on the success of these fine young teams.. TERMON U13’S FACE ST.EUNAN’S IN COUNTY FINAL AFTER DEFEATING KILLYBEGS was last modified: October 15th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAANoticesSportTermonlast_img read more

DONEGAL MAN WINS €30,000 CAR ON WINNING STREAK

first_imgTom Bonner from Ballybofey won a car worth €30,000 on the Car or Cash segment of the Winning Streak Game Show on Saturday.Pictured at the presentation of winning cheques were, from left to right: Sinead Kennedy, game show co-host; Tom Bonner the winning player; Eddie Banville, Head of Marketing at the National Lottery and Marty Whelan, game show co-host. Pic: Mac Innes PhotographyDONEGAL MAN WINS €30,000 CAR ON WINNING STREAK was last modified: September 1st, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:00030BallybofeycarWinning Streaklast_img read more

JIMMY’S WINNING MATCHES AT CELTIC – MCGUINNESS PART OF MANAGEMENT STAFF FOR FIVE-STAR VICTORY

first_imgJIM MCGUINNESS will appear on The Saturday Night Show tonight.Jim McGuinness took his place on the bench alongside Celtic manager Ronnie Delia for Celtic’s 5-0 victory over Ross County earlier this afternoon.His presence on the bench signifies the central role he’s now having with the first-team at Celtic Park.One of Delia’s first moves as manager of Celtic was to promote McGuinness from working with the club’s youth set-up into the first-team. However, today was the first time McGuinness took his place on the bench alongside Delia.Celtic have been struggling of late, and lost 1-0 to Hamilton Academical last weekend.Manager Ronnie Delia has come under scrutiny from the Celtic faithful due to a succession of bad results.However, with Jimmy on board today, Celtic were back winning matches as they thrashed Ross County 5-0. McGuinness stepped down as Donegal manager a fortnight ago after four glorious years at the helm.He hasn’t given an interview since his departure, but it’s believed he stepped down because of his promotion with the first-team at Celtic Park.McGuinness will give his first interview tonight, when he appears on RTE’s The Saturday Night Show, and is expected to reveal why he walked away from the Donegal job.JIMMY’S WINNING MATCHES AT CELTIC – MCGUINNESS PART OF MANAGEMENT STAFF FOR FIVE-STAR VICTORY was last modified: October 18th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:celtic fcFeaturesJim McGuinnessnewsRTESportlast_img read more