Collins aims for the Dail and joins O’Dea on party ticket

first_imgLinkedin Print Fianna Fail Limerick City General Election Candidates, Cllr James Collins and Willie O’Dea TD.Picture: Keith Wiseman Previous articleGarda investigate assault and brazen handbag snatchNext articleArmed teen arrested in cash and drugs seizure Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie LimerickNewsLocal NewsPoliticsCollins aims for the Dail and joins O’Dea on party ticketBy Staff Reporter – April 10, 2018 1098 Facebook Twitter Advertisement Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads TAGSFianna Fáilgeneral electionGerry CollinsJames CollinslimerickMichael Collinsniall collins Email WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival IF you are a Collins and from Limerick, politics is sure to course through your veins and for newly selected Fianna Fail general election candidate James Collins, that is certainly very true.His father was a TD, his uncle a cabinet Minister and his first cousin a party spokesperson in three portfolios and now the Dooradoyle native is looking to elevate his political carer to capture a seat at the next elected Dail.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Addressing the recent selection convention, the married father of four wants to help mould “a city that works for you”.With Limerick claiming recent accolades at European level, James Collins feels that Limerick’s reputation is now soaring after it announced 2,500 jobs last year, something that can be built upon.“I got involved in local politics nine years ago when Limerick was in a much darker place. Job losses hit hard. I felt I could help. My friends, my neighbours, our community, they were all in a bad place. My business was in the middle of a neighbourhood that needed help to change. The economy of Limerick needed to change to survive the downturn and get back on the road to recovery.“The single biggest lesson I’ve learned in those nine years is that politics can help change people’s lives, so long as you have a long-term vision, and a strategy for getting there.“Limerick is a case study in how to strategically tackle economic issues; in how to put in place structures and cultures that allow businesses to flourish, generate employment, and in turn create opportunities for people to live in a city that works for them.The elected local authority representative said that brave decisions by local councillors “were the springboard for the strategic recovery of our city.“We took some tough decisions to stabilise the local authority’s finances, and this gave us the ability to buy strategic sites for development around the city.Noting that Limerick is the European City of the Future for 2018/19, Cllr Collins said that this was evident “because all around us we can see Limerick’s future taking shape – whether it’s hard-working families enjoying some leisure time in Mungret Park, or the young men and women in their 20s embarking on financially rewarding and diverse careers in IT, financial services, or the digital economy.”James Collins graduated from the University of Limerick and travelled before he and his wife Eileen returned to Limerick to settle and raise their family.In 2000 Limerick had few opportunities, but that has changed as “the Limerick of today is High tech, Fintech, Pharma, Life Sciences. It is Dell, General Motors, WP Engine, Regeneron, Uber, Vistakon, Jaguar, Stats, Edwards Life Sciences, Tekro, and Design Pro. It is Limerick for Engineering, Limerick for IT. It is Troy Studios. There is more to come.“We have diversified. We are thinking differently, bigger, better, smarter.The city’s progress will shine through developments like the Opera Site and Gardens International but we can be under no illusions: there are many social problems that remain, Cllr Collins said.“Life is about living, so while we build the economy, we also have to build the society around it.Selected on the Fianna Fail party ticket, James Collins said that he wants to help make sure that everyone has a fair chance, and an equal opportunity to access jobs and education, housing and healthcare.“The reason I want to take the next step now and represent Limerick City in Dail Eireann, is because the problems that still exist: the housing and rental crisis, overcrowding at University Hospital Limerick, social deprivation, crime, the lack of a proper 21st Century transport network for our city – these are problems that have to be addressed through national policy.Limerick needs political leadership to match this ambition and deliver Limerick’s future. That’s why I’m putting my name forward for election to Dail Eireann.James Collins joins sitting TD Willie O’Dea as the candidates for the next general election in a bid to gain a second seat for his party as the Limerick man feels “we need a government less focussed on trying to look good and more focused on doing good.”See more Limerick news here Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Windows on the world

first_imgIn the past 20 years, the Weissman International Internship Program has enabled 576 Harvard College students to work and experience life in 87 countries. This year, 49 students participated in the program, the largest number ever.On Thursday, representatives of that group joined program alumni, Harvard faculty, staff, and three generations of the Weissman family to honor Paul Weissman ’52 and Harriet Weissman, the program’s namesakes, at a reception at University Hall.Michelle Wu ’07 was a Weissman intern in 2006. She took a break from her campaign for Boston city councilor-at-large to give thanks to the program. “I interned at a Shanghai law firm,” she said. “Without that experience, I wouldn’t have gone to law school, and I wouldn’t be running for office.”Harvard President Drew Faust addressed the reception, heralding the Weissmans’ generosity — not just for the program, but also for Paul Weissman’s fundraising for his College class, which he has spearheaded every year since graduation, and his work at the Harvard Foundation. She also acknowledged the couple’s longtime personal “friendship and support” during her years at Radcliffe, and thanked them for escorting her to her first Harvard-Yale game.Paul Weissman thanked Faust, saying the program “has given us tremendous pleasure and satisfaction.”He also thanked Jay Harris, dean of undergraduate education, for his help securing the hall’s faculty room for the reception. “Not everyone gets this room,” he explained, to laughter.Weissman acknowledged the work of Vice President for Alumni Affairs and Development Tamara Rogers, Sidney Knafel ’52, M.B.A. ’54, and University Distinguished Service Professor Joseph Nye for their help in launching the program in the early ’90s. “It’s been going gangbusters ever since,” he declared, to more laughter.Harriet Weissman spoke next, in a soft, rolling voice. She playfully chided her husband of 52 years for saying everything she had wanted to say. The program’s participants, she said, “make us feel optimistic about the future.”“It’s rare for something in academia to be fresh for 20 years,” Harris said, but the Weissman program has remained so despite starting “before today’s undergrads were even born.”“Before Harvard fully embraced international study,” Harris said, “the Weissmans were.”Weissman Program participant Li Murphy ’15 spent this past summer “working with bees, beekeepers, and on world development” in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, the first participant to intern there. Murphy said the experience reinforced to her how important bees are to understanding the health of ecosystems around the world. She also brought back plenty of honey.“Thanks to the Weissmans,” she said, “from the bottom of my heart and the bottom of my stomach.”Mateus Falci ’14 edited and mixed documentary footage for a film company in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The experience, he said, was “less L.A. and more nice people.” The program enabled him to live as Brazilians do, and to work on actual films — something he suspects an American internship wouldn’t have included.Naimonu James ’14 spent her summer in Malaysia, working at a fine arts gallery. “I came back with a sense of what I want to spend the rest of my life doing, which is to spend it in galleries.”The three students presented the Weissmans with a silver cup filled with the flags of the 87 countries the students had visited.The reception, sponsored by the Office of Career Services, was originally slated for last spring, but was rescheduled following the Boston Marathon bombings.last_img read more

Para Los Niños executive named Senior Fellow

first_imgThe Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab housed in the Marshall School of Business recently named Martine Singer, president and CEO of Para Los Niños, a senior fellow. Singer will work with students in the lab as a mentor and career resource.The BSEL, established in 2008, works with Marshall students to address social issues with business practices. Singer’s background with PLN, a nonprofit dedicated to academic access and opportunities for children living in poverty in the Los Angeles area, provides expertise in the field.“The Los Angeles Times ran an editorial about children playing on skid row in broken glass and feces-filled areas,” said Patrick Sinclair, vice president of development and Communications for PLN. “A social worker and an actress read that article and decided to do something about it.”Founded in 1980, PLN worked to bring various facilities, including eight charter preschools and social work facilities to the metro area — all serving the purpose of helping low-income children receive an education.Singer has worked with PLN since 2012, but has a diverse and unique background. Her work at Hollygrove, an L.A. nonprofit dedicated to helping at-risk children and their families, oversaw a transformation from primarily community-based services to a merger with a statewide organization.“I began as a tutor and eventually got to know the woman who was running the organization and found that I had skills that would be helpful from my experience doing consulting,” Singer said.Singer did not always work for the nonprofit sector. With an M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management, as well as past work with The New York Times and the L.A. Times, she perfected the art of utilizing skills from one sector in another.“The expectation [at the Yale School of Management] was that you would cross-fertilize going from one sector to the other,” Singer said. “I think that’s turned out to be very true. You’re a better nonprofit leader having had experience in another space. When you work only in the business sector, you don’t necessarily have an appreciation for the social impact of the work you do.”Sinclair agrees that Singer’s ability to synthesize her business background with an innovative outlook will make her a great mentor and career resource for Marshall students.“She’s extremely creative,” Sinclair said. “In a world like this, where you’re dealing with acute problems in dealing with families and children or huge bureaucratic snafus because you’re dealing with county agencies and things like that, Martine is good at either finding ways around the obstacles to better serve the families and the children or to find ways to get the agency to meet the needs we’re trying to meet.”Today, Singer’s duties as president and CEO include managing a $32 million budget, planning the restructuring activities necessary to turn a social services agency into an education provider and engaging the community in educational awareness programs among various other functions. She acknowledged the many challenges faced in the nonprofit sector.“Resources are always tight in nonprofits,” Singer said. “Not just money, but time — everyone is stretched really thin. I don’t think a lot of nonprofit leaders necessarily have the experience in business to give them the confidence to do something like this. Sometimes there is a lack among leadership of deep understanding of business.”Singer said she believes a business background and experiences like the social enterprise lab bring special insight and problem-solving skills to such challenges.“It gives [students] insight into the practical application of what they’re learning,” Singer said. “It gives them the opportunity to operationalize some of the things that they might be studying in a classroom environment. It’s a way of seeing things come to life.”For students interested in pursuing social entrepreneurship, Singer offered some advice.“They need to get some practical experience as interns or volunteers at non-profit [organizations],” she said. “They can bring a tremendous level of innovation and energy to a sector that isn’t necessarily always considered the most creative or the most entrepreneurial. They have a lot to offer if they can find a way in.”last_img read more