News from the courts

first_img Previous articleBig freeze sees only six remainNext articleMembers sought by musical society admin Pipe bomb accused back in courtAPPEARING via video link at a sitting of Limerick District Court, 24-year-old William O’Dwyer will reappear on January 13 next when he will be formally serviced with the book of evidence relating to drugs and explosive charges before the court.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up O’Dwyer of Richmond Court, Mount Kennett Place, was questioned by gardai after he presented himself at the station and was charged with the possession of a pipe bomb in October of last year. The gardai allegedly caught a teenage girl carrying the ‘live’ explosive device in St Mary’s Park. Inspector Gerry Horan told the court that the file had been sent to the DPP on December 22 last, and they were awaiting the directions.Judge Aeneas McCarthy noted that “time had been running” in relation to the charges and adjourned the matter for two weeks and marked the case pre-emptory against the state for production of the Book of Evidence in relation to the charge contrary to Section 4 of the Explosive Substance Act 1883. Judge McCarthy also noted that O’Dwyer be returned to court on the same date to deal with other outstanding matters before the court. O’Dwyer was remanded back in custody to Limerick Prison. Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Advertisement Print NewsLocal NewsNews from the courtsBy admin – January 7, 2010 1019 Man to be served book of evidence on robbery chargeA HANDBAG thief will be formally served with the book of evidence relating to a robbery in the city last month.Michael Power, Fairgreen, Ballysimon, who is currently serving a 10 month sentence for a handbag snatch last year, was ordered to be presented in court on January 13 by Judge Aeneas McCarthy. Power appeared via video link from Limerick Prison and, following an earlier failed application for bail, was remanded in custody on these charges.The 27-year-old is alleged to have snatched a handbag from an elderly lady at St Michael’s Church on Denmark Street, and gardai had earlier objected to the courts granting bail as under Section 2 of the Bail Act 1997. Linkedin Email Man arrested in possession of knifeA NINETEEN-year-old man appeared at Limerick District Court following his arrest on December 29 last in Limerick City, after gardai found him in possession of a knife and cannabis resin.Martin Morey, with an address of 10 Collins Avenue, was charged by garda Yohan Hunt with possession of the knife contrary to Section 9 (1) of the firearms and offensive weapons act 1990. Giving details in court, garda Hunt outlined that the accused made no reply when formally charged. The arresting officer also noted that an existing bench warrant was outstanding for the accused man in relation to Section 24 (3) of the Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act 1994 of giving a false or misleading name when questioned by gardai. Inspector Gerry Horan said that the state would consent to bail on the basis that a €200 cash lodgement be made. Judge Aeneas McCarthy remanded the accused in custody, with consent to bail, to appear again in court later this week. Murder accused remanded in custodyDRESSED in a blue and white tracksuit and appearing via video link to Limerick District Court, Kenneth Collopy, charged with the murder of Daniel Fitzgerald at Cloughdromin, Ballysimon, on December 8 of last year, was remanded back in to custody to Limerick Prison as the gardai finalise preparations of the Book of Evidence relating to the 24-year-old’s death. Inspector Gerry Horan sought a two week adjournment but the defence solicitor John Herbert, consented to a further 28 day remand. 19-year-old Collopy will be present in court on January 27 next when the book of evidence will be formally serviced. The accused made no reply during the three minute court sitting. last_img read more

Watch The Empire State Building Synchronize Lights To Steely Dan’s “FM (No Static At All)”

first_imgOn September 3rd, 2017, we received the saddening news that Steely Dan guitarist and co-founder Walter Becker had passed away at the age of 67. The music world will long remember the innovative songs he wrote with longtime friend and lone surviving original member Donald Fagen. The New York band, formed in 1967 while the two were at Bard College, was well-known for being meticulous in their songwriting process in the studio, creating numerous brilliant albums over the years. Steely Dan’s prolific creativity earned the band a devoted cult following, several Grammy Awards (including “Album of the Year” for Two Against Nature in 2001), and an induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001, in addition to selling tens of millions of albums sold worldwide.Another notch in the duo’s belt came back on October 29th, 2015, when the Empire State Building celebrated the 50th anniversary of it’s Master FM Antenna, which sits atop the world-famous skyscraper and anchors the iconic Manhattan skyline. Legendary lighting designer Marc Brickman—who also orchestrated an ESB light show for the Grateful Dead‘s Fare Thee Well show on July 4, 2015—fittingly choreographed the LED Tower Lights to the band’s 1978 hit “FM (No Static at All).” The song was written as the lead single for the film FM, which was about disc jockeys working at a popular radio station fighting to keep radio freeform. Take a look at pro-shot aerial footage of the memorable Empire State Building Steely Dan light show display below in all its glory:Steely Dan – “FM (No Static At All)” – Empire State Building Light Show[Video: Empire State Building]This was not the only time that Walter Becker was honored in high-profile fashion by the Big Apple. On Saturday, October 28th, 2018, the City of New York held a ceremony to officially rename a Queens city block in Becker’s honor. The street sign for Walter Becker Way is now posted on the corner of 112th Street and 72nd Drive. According to an early release about the re-naming that mirrored Becker’s sly sense of humor, “This represents the kind of street credibility that Becker truly would have appreciated!”Fans of Steely Dan can catch a very special late-night tribute their music in at Republic NOLA in New Orleans during Jazz Fest on Thursday, May 2nd (technically early-morning May 3rd). Led by musical director Joey Porter (The Motet), the lineup will feature Lyle Divinsky (The Motet), Nick Cassarino (The Nth Power), Nate Edgar (The Nth Power), Michelangelo Carubba (Turkuaz), Craig Brodhead (Turkuaz), Shira Elias (Turkuaz), Sammi Garett (Turkuaz), Josh Schwartz (Turkuaz), Greg Sanderson (Turkuaz), Chris Brouwers (Turkuaz), Nate Werth (Snarky Puppy, Ghost-Note), and Bryan McNamara.For more information on the New Orleans Steely Dan tribute, head here.You can grab your tickets here.last_img read more

Nassau’s Denenberg Proposes Dog Abuse Prevention Law

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County Legis. Dave Denenberg (D-Merrick) has proposed a bill that would ensure that dogs are protected from harmful and inhumane restraint.The Nassau Democrat unleashed his proposal at the Bobby and the Strays Freeport Shelter Thursday afternoon. Called the “Tethering Law,” the bill is intended to address the “common and widespread form of animal abuse which has gone unaddressed for too long. With distressing frequency, pets are tethered, chained, leashed or otherwise restrained in ways which cause them severe pain and physical injury, subject them to dangerously unhealthy weather conditions such as extreme heat and cold, and deny them adequate access to food and water for extended periods of time.”The legislation goes on to describe the cruel ways pets are unreasonably confined, unable to exercise for their “physical and emotional health and well-being,” and forced to reside in unsanitary conditions, defecating and urinating in the same restricted space where they eat, move and rest.Nassau Democratic Legis. Dave Denenberg (D-Merrick) poses with his beloved canine friend Chloe, who he rescued.The bill prohibits the use of a “choke collar or pinch collar” that deliberately impairs the flow of oxygen to the pet, or could get embedded in the pet’s skin. It would ban a chain that has links more than a quarter-inch thick. It prohibits a restraining device that weighs more than 10 percent of the animals’ total body weight, not to exceed 25 pounds for any animal. Nor should it be less than 10 feet long but it should not be long enough to let the animal “move over an object or edge that could result in strangulation or injury.” The bill also comes with a time limit: “No person shall tether, leash, fasten, secure, restrain, chain or tie an animal to any stationary object outdoors for more than two hours in any 12-hour period.”Someone found guilty of violating this new law would face a maximum fine of $500 for the first offense, a $1,000 maximum fine for a second violation, and a $1,500 maximum fine for a third or more violation.“I made a goal at the start of 2014 to use any and all of my legislative power to protect animals here in Nassau,” said Denenberg, who is running for state Senate this fall to replace state Sen. Charles Fuschillo, Jr., who abruptly resigned last year. “It had come to my attention that there were some serious voids legislatively as far as protection of pets and I made it my top priority to change that. The Tethering Law I filed today is just another important step toward bringing real justice to animals.” Denenberg himself is a longtime dog owner and animal advocate. “I look at my dog Chloe and I just can’t imagine not giving her the room to walk and run when she is outside,” he said.last_img read more

Hamptons’ £8m profits prompt expansion

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PSG contract offer ‘fake news’ – Wenger

first_imgArsenal’s French manager Arsene Wenger (C) stands on the touchlineParis, France | AFP | Under-pressure Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger dismissed as “fake news” reports that Paris Saint-Germain had offered him a two-year deal at the French champions.The Frenchman is facing a fan backlash at Arsenal after a rotten run of form and British tabloid The Sun said on Monday that PSG had offered him a contract to replace Unai Emery this summer.Wenger, who has reportedly decided to stay at Arsenal despite mounting pressure to quit, told beIN Sports of the PSG link: “It’s a false rumour, it’s ‘fake news’. I say formally: it is not true.”Following a damaging 3-1 loss at West Bromwich Albion on Saturday, Arsenal’s fourth defeat in five Premier League games, the 67-year-old said he had made up his mind about his future. “I know what I’ll do in my future, so you will know very soon,” he told reporters.British media subsequently said Wenger, who has been in charge at Arsenal since 1996, was set to sign a new contract.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Officials ponder easing mobility for doctors nurses between provinces

first_imgHALIFAX — Efforts to create regional licensing for health care professionals in Atlantic Canada could be the vanguard for similar changes nationally, a leading advocate says.The four East Coast premiers called this week for common licensing for doctors, nurses and other health professionals, saying allowing them to easily move between provinces would improve people’s access to care.The registrar of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Newfoundland and Labrador, Dr. Linda Inkpen, said work has actually been underway for a year to align licensing regimes in Atlantic Canada.Inkpen, who is also president of the Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada, said the regional work is an offshoot of an issue that has been on the national radar for at least a decade as issues around internal trade gained prominence.She said the issue has gained added impetus over the last few years.“Anything that we can do that enhances mobility of our physicians helps directly and indirectly the public and the patients whom we exist to serve,” said Inkpen.At the national level, Inkpen said ongoing talks have been focused on two areas — the streamlining of regular licensing for fully licensed doctors with no disciplinary history, and to help free up locum physicians, who move from province-to-province for fill-in work.“We are hopeful … that we will have come to an agreement if not in all colleges across Canada, certainly in some colleges, so that we can make that process a little easier for our physicians,” she said.Inkpen concedes it will take longer to get some form of agreement nationally, however, she believes something can be in place in Atlantic Canada sooner.“It’s going to take a little bit longer but we are talking months, we’re not talking years,” she said. “We are talking I would say within 12 months.”The national work is more complicated and will require “more than the colleges to sort it out” Inkpen said. She said provinces and territories will need to get more involved, because colleges are governed by 13 different pieces of legislation.Atlantic Canada’s premiers want to see movement to improve mobility across a range of professions.But they believe it’s especially important for health care workers such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists and physiotherapists, given the region faces challenges posed by an aging population and higher-than-average incidences of chronic diseases.Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil said it’s part of the puzzle to improve access to primary care in his province, where many people don’t have a family doctor.“One of the biggest complaints that we’ve heard around the whole process is how difficult it is to be allowed to practice in the province,” he said. “We want to provide some consistency within the region, and I would argue once we are able to do that it will probably go national.”Janet Hazelton, president of the Nova Scotia Nurses Union, said she has talked to a nurse in Alberta who wants to move east, but has been waiting for three months for a temporary licence.“I’m not sure why sometimes it takes so long,” said Hazelton of the time period it can take to work in another province.She points to Ontario, where she says registered nurses are currently being laid off.“They are laying off registered nurses and we (Nova Scotia) can’t hire enough. But if it’s going to take them three months to get a licence then that’s a deterrent.”She said harmonized and streamlined licensing would also help nurses who live in border areas and have to pay twice if they want to work in both provinces: “That’s a lot of money.”Dr. Sheila Marchant-Short, registrar for the College of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island, said the issue has the attention of national nursing bodies, and there are “certainly benefits to figuring something out.”“As an Atlantic group we haven’t had a really fulsome discussion yet,” she said. “So we will in a response to the Atlantic premiers, but we aren’t there yet.”Keith Doucette, The Canadian Presslast_img read more