Only the beginning for Limerick political revolutionary Cian

first_imgBilly Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live A big thank you to his supporters from Cllr Cian Prendiville.by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A big thank you to his supporters from Cllr Cian Prendiville.ANTI Austerity Alliance councillor Cian Prendiville who was just 278 votes short of unseating Education Minister Jan O’Sullivan in the General Election warned this week that his party are here to stay.Cllr Prendiville, who received a total of 6,774 votes, was back out on the streets of Limerick City this Monday to thank all those who voted for the AAA.“We are here to stay, and this election is just the beginning of a political revolution,” he insisted.“The political elite is in free fall. Their time is passing, and our political revolution has only just begun.”Cllr Prendiville also appealed to all those who voted for him and the AAA, to now take the next step and get involved in building this new movement for workers and young people by joining up.“I see a lot of talk about how Fianna Fáil gained votes in Limerick, and obviously they did. However, far bigger than any swing to Fianna Fail was the huge swing to AAA. We can add to this the 2,500 people who gave their first preference to O’Dea, largely because they felt they owed him a favour but then voted for us as a statement of their desire for real change,” he claimed.“Don’t believe the hype, this election is still Fianna Fáil’s second worst election in the history of the State. In fact, they have even gone down across the country compared to the percentage vote they got in the local elections two years ago. The real story of this election is the collapse of the political elite and the huge breakthrough made by the AAA in building a real alternative,” he concluded. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Previous articleHermitage Green launch ‘Save Your Soul’ this Saturday at HMV LimerickNext articleLimerick woman rescued from bridge over River Shannon Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Twittercenter_img Print NewsLocal NewsOnly the beginning for Limerick political revolutionary CianBy Alan Jacques – March 3, 2016 760 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Facebook Linkedin WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads TAGSAnti Austerity AllianceCllr Cian Prendivillegeneral election 2016limerick Emaillast_img read more

COVID-19 treatment test linked to increased risk of cardiac issues

first_img Read Full Story Since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a Public Health Concern of Global Interest on Jan. 30, more than one million have tested positive for the illness in the United States, and more than 62,000 have died. With no FDA–approved treatments available to date, the anti-malarial drug, hydroxychloroquine, has emerged as a potential therapy for the pneumonia associated with COVID-19, with or without the antibiotic azithromycin.In a brief report published this week in JAMA Cardiology, a team of pharmacists and clinicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, found evidence suggesting that patients who received hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 were at increased risk of electrical changes to the heart and cardiac arrhythmias. The combination of hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin was linked to even greater changes compared to hydroxychloroquine alone.“While hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin are generally well-tolerated medications, increased usage in the context of COVID-19 will likely increase the frequency of adverse drug events (ADEs),” said co-first author Nicholas J. Mercuro, a pharmacy specialist in infectious diseases at BIDMC. “This is especially concerning given that that patients with underlying cardiac co-morbidities appear to be disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and that the virus itself may damage the heart.”Hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin each can cause an electrical disturbance in the heart known as a QTc prolongation, indicated by a longer space between specific peaks on an electrocardiogram. QTc prolongation denotes that the heart muscle is taking milliseconds longer than normal to recharge between beats. The delay can cause cardiac arrhythmias, which in turn increases the likelihood of cardiac arrest, stroke or death.In this single-center, retrospective, observational study, Mercuro and colleagues evaluated 90 adults with COVID-19 who were hospitalized at BIDMC between March 1 and April 7, and received at least one day of hydroxychloroquine. More than half of these patients also had high blood pressure, and more than 30 percent had diabetes.Seven patients (19 percent) who received hydroxychloroquine alone developed prolonged QTc of 500 milliseconds or more, and three patients had a change in QTc of 60 milliseconds or more. Of the 53 patients who also received azithromycin, 21 percent had prolonged QTc of 500 milliseconds or more, and 13 percent experienced a change in QTc of 60 milliseconds or more.“In our study, patients who were hospitalized and receiving hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 frequently experienced QTc prolongation and adverse drug events,” said co-first author Christina F. Yen, MD, of BIDMC’s Department of Medicine. “One participant taking the drug combination experienced a potentially lethal tachycardia called torsades de pointes, which to our knowledge has yet to be reported elsewhere in the peer-reviewed COVID-19 literature.”In 2003, preliminary data suggested hydroxychloroquine may be effective against SARS-CoV-1, a fatal but hard-to-transmit respiratory virus related to the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. More recently, a small study of patients with COVID-19 appeared to benefit from the anti-malarial drug. Subsequent research, however, has failed to confirm either finding. In light oftheir data, Gold and colleagues urge caution and careful consideration before administering hydroxychloroquine as treatment for COVID-19.“If considering the use of hydroxychloroquine, particularly combined with azithromycin, clinicians should carefully weigh the risks and benefits, and closely monitor QTc — particularly considering patients’ co-morbidities and concomitant medication use,” said senior author Howard S. Gold, MD, an infectious disease specialist at BIDMC and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Based on our current knowledge, hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19 should probably be limited to clinical trials.”Co-authors included BIDMC’s Christopher M. McCoy, David J. Shim , Peter J. Zimetbaum, and Timothy R. Maher.last_img read more

Yaphank Man Shot, Dog Killed by Gunman Who Set Home on Fire

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 27-year-old man and two of his dogs were shot, killing one of the dogs, by a gunman who set the victim’s Yaphank home on fire on Tuesday, Suffolk County police said.The shooter entered the victim’s Long Island Avenue home and opened fire before igniting the blaze and fleeing the scene at 5:30 p.m., police said.Yaphank Fire Department firefighters extinguished the flames with the help of the Medford Fire Department, Ridge Fire Department, Brookhaven Fire Department and Middle Island Fire Department.The victim was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he was treated for serious but non-life-threatening injuries. The surviving dog was taken to a local animal clinic, where he was being treated and is recovering. The dead dog was taken to the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office to have the bullet removed for the investigation.Sixth Squad and Arson Section detectives ask anyone with information on this case to call them at 631-854-8652 or anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will remain confidential.last_img read more

Australia warns economy to shrink record 7% in Q2

first_imgMuch of the forecast deficit comes from massive stimulus spending designed to keep the economy afloat and prevent a full-blown economic depression. The government has rolled out around Aus$289 billion in economic stimulus to cushion the country from the virus fallout, Frydenberg said, including support for workers, businesses and retirees.Unemployment – currently at a two-decade high of 7.4 percent – is expected to peak at 9.3 percent in December.The Australian dollar dipped 0.3 percent Thursday, while shares on the S&P/ASX 200 were flat.However, the government is predicting a quick recovery with the economy returning to growth in the third quarter as easing virus restrictions bring increased activity.Frydenberg also predicted GDP would grow 2.5 percent in 2021, partially based on the assumption that international borders would open from January 1.Australia has recorded more than 13,000 cases of COVID-19 and 133 deaths from the virus.The government is expected to deliver its budget in full in October, while economic growth figures are released in September.Topics : Officials said gross domestic product would contract 7 percent in April-June, pushing the economy into recession for the first time in nearly three decades.A recession is defined as two consecutive quarters of contraction and the economy shrank 0.3 percent in the previous three months.Treasurer Josh Frydenberg also said the budget deficit would blow out to Aus$185 (US$132) billion – almost a tenth of GDP – in the year to June 30, 2021, having hit Aus$86 billion in the previous 12 months.”These harsh numbers reflect the harsh reality we face,” Frydenberg said. “The economic outlook remains very uncertain.” Australia warned on Thursday that its economy will shrink at its fastest pace in history during the second quarter, while the budget deficit will be the biggest since the Second World War as the country battles to contain the impact of the coronavirus.The government has stumped up tens of billions of dollars to fight the pandemic, which has ravaged global trade and forced the shutdown of much of the country earlier in the year, crippling the economy.The reimposition of a six-week lockdown on five million people in Melbourne, the second-biggest city, has added to the struggles for a country already reeling from a prolonged drought and massive bushfires before the disease struck.last_img read more