Gearbulk Grieg Star Win US Antitrust Approval for JV

first_imgzoom The US Department of Justice has decided to approve the establishment of G2 Ocean, a joint venture (JV) of Switzerland-based shipping company Gearbulk and Norwegian Grieg Star.Authorities in Poland, Germany and Brazil have already approved the JV, the duo said in a statement.According to the two firms, the project is on schedule to have G2 Ocean fully operational by the end of the first half of 2017.The JV will operate a fleet of open hatch, semi-open hatch and conventional bulk vessels, with a total of over 130 ships.The parties revealed in October 2016 that 65% of the JV will be held by Gearbulk, while Grieg Star will hold the remaining 35%.The JV will be formed as an independent dry bulk shipping company headquartered in Bergen, Norway, with worldwide offices.“We anticipated such a conclusion from the authorities. But that does not mean the final approval was not received with joy. Now we roll up our sleeves and continue the hard work. Our goal is still to create a world class shipping company for the future,” Rune Birkeland, G2 Ocean’s CEO, commented.last_img read more

130 kg of soaked dried Afghan heroin seized

first_imgNew Delhi: Special Cell of Delhi Police on Friday said that they recovered about 130 kilograms of soaked and dried heroin being imported under the cover of a basil seed consignment from a container in Navi Mumbai.The consignment originated from Islam Qila, Herat, Afghanistan and took the sea-route to Mumbai via Bandar Abbas in Iran. Two people, a Delhi-based man and a Kandahari Afghan national were arrested during the raids. Total recoveries in ongoing operation now exceed 330 kilograms with a street value of about Rs 1,320 crores. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderPolice identified the accused as Tifal Nau Khez who is believed to be the kingpin of the drug cartel and Ahmad Shah Alokozai a native of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Deputy Commissioner of Police (special cell) Manishi Chandra said that after the arrest of one Ahmad Shah, based upon his revelations, a team was dispatched to Mumbai to search for a suspected cargo which was lying somewhere in the vast JNPT Nhava Sheva area of Navi Mumbai. “The team conducted a thorough search at the Customs Bonded area in Maharashtra. A container which was imported by the arrested accused through his contacts in Mumbai from the Bandar Abbas port of Iran was found containing about 260 Jute Bags with Basil seeds,” said DCP Chandra. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsDCP special cell further said that on opening the jute bags, it was found to contain another jute bag covered with thin white colour polythene layering. The inner jute bag covered with thin white colour polythene was found containing soaked and dried Afghan Heroin. Each bag has approximately 500 gms of pure raw heroin. On the directions of his handlers based in Afghanistan, Tifal Nau Khez had setup a reconstitution factory at a flat in Zakir Nagar. He was the one who oversaw all the operations from reconstitution to delivery of processed Heroin in Punjab on the directions of Afghan-based drug lord Haji. Alokozai is living in Delhi for the past few years under the cover of wholesale dry fruits dealer. “This time he was given the of handling the consignment of Basil seeds from Mumbai port. This consignment was also sent by druglord Haji, this time through sea route,” said DCP Cell.last_img read more

Appeal Court blasts judge for failures to give reasons quashes verdict

first_imgTORONTO – Ontario’s top court sharply rebuked a prominent judge on Thursday for repeatedly failing to explain why she had acquitted a man accused of beating and sexually assaulting a woman.In setting aside the acquittal and ordering the man face a new trial, the Appeal Court expressed dismay at the conduct displayed by Superior Court Justice Susanne Goodman.“Our order directing a new trial is a terrible result for everyone involved in this proceeding,” Justice David Doherty wrote for the court. “The trial judge’s failure to give reasons, despite her repeated promises to do so, has frustrated the proper administration of justice.”In a post-script to the decision, the Appeal Court said the judge had displayed similar behaviour in the past.“Nor is this the first time that this trial judge’s failure to provide reasons has required this court to order a new trial,” the Appeal Court said. “It must be the last time.”Roslyn Levine, a spokeswoman for Superior Court Chief Justice Forster Smith, told The Canadian Press that it would not be appropriate to contact the Toronto-based judge directly.“As this matter is now before the Canadian Judicial Council, it would be inappropriate for Chief Justice Smith to comment on it,” Levine said.The new issue arose after Goodman dismissed all charges against Stanislaw Sliwka in March last year. He was charged after a distressed woman, who can only be identified as A.C., called 911 from an apartment in March 2014.Police were “horrified” to find A.C. had been badly beaten and needed immediate medical assistance, court records show. Her injuries included severe bruising, swelling, numerous cuts, and bleeding to her face and head.During a nine-day trial, A.C. accused Sliwka of repeatedly physically and sexually assaulting her over many months when she lived with him. He denied the assaults. Instead, he called her a drunk who sometimes hurt herself when she fell. He also blamed her injuries on an unknown intruder that had broken into the apartment. His evidence contradicted police testimony.At the end of the trial, Goodman acquitted him, saying she had carefully considered the matter. She said she did not intend the acquittal to be taken as sign she totally believed him or totally disbelieved A.C., but said that on the whole, she was not satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt of his guilt.“My detailed written reasons will be released on Monday, March 14, 2016,” Goodman said.However, Goodman, who has sat on the court since 2000, failed to release her reasons as promised. Over the following six months, prosecution lawyers repeatedly asked for them, only to be told by Goodman’s assistant that they would be forthcoming on a particular date. It never happened.When the prosecution wrote directly to Goodman last September to say the Crown would argue the appeal should go ahead on the basis that there were no written reasons for the acquittal, the judge simply didn’t respond.At an appeal hearing this month, the prosecution argued the brief comments Goodman made at trial weren’t intended to explain her decision and didn’t count as reasons. As such, they said, the not-guilty verdict had to be overturned.Sliwka argued in response that Goodman’s brief comments were adequate, and that her decision was properly based on trial evidence. The Appeal Court disagreed.“There is no way of knowing how the trial judge arrived at her verdicts,” Doherty wrote.In 2011, the Appeal Court ordered a new trial for a man charged with a weapons offence because Goodman took 25 months to deliver her ruling. In February, the court ordered a new hearing for woman challenging her detention order because Goodman had failed to deliver reasons for keeping her behind bars.last_img read more

Indigenousowned energy firms grappling with oil bust

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt has been the economic engine of Canada for decades.The tar sands boom has yielded unprecedented prosperity. With the steady drop of oil prices in recent months, that boom has turned to bust.APTN’s Brandi Morin has this story about how Indigenous companies in Alberta are coping with the changes.last_img