Volunteering & giving rates steady but still lower than in 2013/14, reports Community Life Survey

first_imgVolunteering & giving rates steady but still lower than in 2013/14, reports Community Life Survey 226 total views, 2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis36 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis36 GivingThree quarters of respondents (75%) had given money to charitable causes in the last four weeks, the same as in 2016-17 but lower than 2013-14’s 82%.Women were more likely to have given to charity than men (79% compared with 70%); this pattern has remained consistent since 2013-14. Older people were more likely to have given to charity than younger people, with 83% of over 75s donating in the last four weeks compared with 57% of 16-24 year olds. People living in the most deprived areas were less likely to have given to charity in the past four weeks than those living in the least deprived areas (67% compared with 80%). The mean amount given in the four weeks prior to completing the survey (excluding those who donated more than £300) remained the same as 2016-17, 2015-16 and 2013-14, at £22, with 13% donating more than £50. Social actionIn 2017-18, 15% of people had been involved in social action in their local area at least once in the last year, similar to 2016-17 (16%). The overall rate of social action has decreased slightly since 2013-14 when 19% were involved.The Community Life Survey (CLS) is an annual survey of adults (16+) in England, with this one running from August 2017 to March 2018, and surveying 10,217 people. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Melanie May | 27 July 2018 | News 225 total views, 1 views today Tagged with: .ngo Individual giving research Volunteering Volunteering and giving remain steady but are still lower than in 2013-14, according to DCMS’s Community Life Survey 2017-18.The Community Life Survey found that nearly two thirds (64%) of people had taken part in either formal or informal volunteering in the last year, similar to 2016-17 (63%) but a gradual decrease since 2013-14 (70%). 38% of people said they had volunteered either formally or informally at least once a month. Again, a similar rate to 2016-17 (39%), but down on 2013-14’s 44%.Those volunteering both formally and informally tended to the over 65s, with 25-34 year olds having the lowest rates of regular formal volunteering at 15%, and those aged 65-74 having the highest rates of regular formal volunteering, at 29%.More key volunteering stats22% volunteered formally at least once a month, and 38% at least once a year27% volunteered informally at least once a month and 53% at least once a year34% of those aged 65+ volunteered informally (34%)16-24 year olds were more likely to have taken part in regular informal volunteering than those aged 35-49 (28% compared with 22%)The economically inactive were more likely to volunteer regularly (29%) than those in employment (22%) and those who are unemployed (19%). People living in rural areas were more likely to volunteer regularly than those living in urban areas (29% compared with 21%)41% of women took part in some form of volunteering at least once a month vs. 36% of men44% of people with a limiting long-term illness or disability did some form of volunteering at least once a month compared to 39% of those withoutPeople in the most deprived area were less likely to have volunteered at least once a month than those from the least deprived areas (33% compared with 44%)The most common reason given for taking part in formal volunteering was ‘I wanted to improve things/ help people’, with almost half of people who volunteered citing this as a reason (46%). ‘The cause was really important to me’ was the next most common reason (31%) and a quarter of people (25%) said ‘I wanted to meet people/ make friends’ or ‘I had spare time to do it’.Barriers to volunteeringHaving work commitments was the biggest barrier to volunteering or to volunteering more frequently, with over half (51%) of those who didn’t volunteer formally citing this as a reason. 37% said they had other things to do in their spare time, and 26% had to look after children/ the home. Advertisementlast_img read more

News from the courts

first_img Previous articleBig freeze sees only six remainNext articleMembers sought by musical society admin Pipe bomb accused back in courtAPPEARING via video link at a sitting of Limerick District Court, 24-year-old William O’Dwyer will reappear on January 13 next when he will be formally serviced with the book of evidence relating to drugs and explosive charges before the court.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up O’Dwyer of Richmond Court, Mount Kennett Place, was questioned by gardai after he presented himself at the station and was charged with the possession of a pipe bomb in October of last year. The gardai allegedly caught a teenage girl carrying the ‘live’ explosive device in St Mary’s Park. Inspector Gerry Horan told the court that the file had been sent to the DPP on December 22 last, and they were awaiting the directions.Judge Aeneas McCarthy noted that “time had been running” in relation to the charges and adjourned the matter for two weeks and marked the case pre-emptory against the state for production of the Book of Evidence in relation to the charge contrary to Section 4 of the Explosive Substance Act 1883. Judge McCarthy also noted that O’Dwyer be returned to court on the same date to deal with other outstanding matters before the court. O’Dwyer was remanded back in custody to Limerick Prison. Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Advertisement Print NewsLocal NewsNews from the courtsBy admin – January 7, 2010 1019 Man to be served book of evidence on robbery chargeA HANDBAG thief will be formally served with the book of evidence relating to a robbery in the city last month.Michael Power, Fairgreen, Ballysimon, who is currently serving a 10 month sentence for a handbag snatch last year, was ordered to be presented in court on January 13 by Judge Aeneas McCarthy. Power appeared via video link from Limerick Prison and, following an earlier failed application for bail, was remanded in custody on these charges.The 27-year-old is alleged to have snatched a handbag from an elderly lady at St Michael’s Church on Denmark Street, and gardai had earlier objected to the courts granting bail as under Section 2 of the Bail Act 1997. Linkedin Email Man arrested in possession of knifeA NINETEEN-year-old man appeared at Limerick District Court following his arrest on December 29 last in Limerick City, after gardai found him in possession of a knife and cannabis resin.Martin Morey, with an address of 10 Collins Avenue, was charged by garda Yohan Hunt with possession of the knife contrary to Section 9 (1) of the firearms and offensive weapons act 1990. Giving details in court, garda Hunt outlined that the accused made no reply when formally charged. The arresting officer also noted that an existing bench warrant was outstanding for the accused man in relation to Section 24 (3) of the Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act 1994 of giving a false or misleading name when questioned by gardai. Inspector Gerry Horan said that the state would consent to bail on the basis that a €200 cash lodgement be made. Judge Aeneas McCarthy remanded the accused in custody, with consent to bail, to appear again in court later this week. Murder accused remanded in custodyDRESSED in a blue and white tracksuit and appearing via video link to Limerick District Court, Kenneth Collopy, charged with the murder of Daniel Fitzgerald at Cloughdromin, Ballysimon, on December 8 of last year, was remanded back in to custody to Limerick Prison as the gardai finalise preparations of the Book of Evidence relating to the 24-year-old’s death. Inspector Gerry Horan sought a two week adjournment but the defence solicitor John Herbert, consented to a further 28 day remand. 19-year-old Collopy will be present in court on January 27 next when the book of evidence will be formally serviced. The accused made no reply during the three minute court sitting. last_img read more