Turkuaz Rings In 2018 With New Paul McCartney & Wings Cover [Video/Photo]

first_imgFunk powerhouse Turkuaz entered 2018 in style with their annual New Year’s Eve celebration, The Ball Drop! The fan-favorite Brooklyn funk act celebrated New Year’s Eve with fellow funksters, Pimps Of Joytime, with a special performance in Baltimore, Maryland at Rams Head Live on Sunday night. The band played a scorching set to a packed crowd, featuring an exciting mix of originals and covers, including Sly & The Family Stone‘s “Babies Makin’ Babies”, Hot Chocolate‘s “Everyone’s A Winner”, The Bar-Kays‘ “Holy Ghost”, and a new cover of Paul McCartney & Wings‘ “Jet”.Greensky Bluegrass Announce 2 Nights At Red Rocks With Turkuaz & California HoneydropsNow entering 2018, the band is about to jump right into Winter Tour starting with a run of dates leading them into Jam Cruise and hitting some Northeast cities. The second leg of the tour begins with a trek through Colorado and the Pacific Northwest that will include numerous ski towns before heading down the West Coast and ending with two shows opening for Galactic in SF and LA. Dates and ticket info can be found on the band’s website.Watch Turkuaz perform “Jet” by Paul McCartney & Wings on New Year’s Eve below:Check out the setlist below, as well as a full photo gallery from Jim Houle Photography.Setlist: Turkuaz | Rams Head Live | Baltimore, MD | 12/31/17Chatte Lunatique, Percy Thrills The Moondog, Nightswimming, If I Ever Fall Asleep, Babies Makin’ Babies*, On the Run, Everyone’s A Winner^, Lookin’ Tough, Feelin’ Good, European Festivity Nightmare, 20 Dollar Bill, Auld Lang Syne, King Computer, Coast To Coast, Tip Toe Through the Crypto, Jet**, The, Generator, Holy Ghost^^, Future 86, Bubba SlideEncore: Monkey Fingers* Sly & the Family Stone Cover^ Hot Chocolate Cover** Paul McCartney & Wings Cover^^ The Bar-Kays CoverTurkuaz | Rams Head Live | Baltimore, MD | 12/31/17 | Photos by Jim Houle Photography Photo: Jim Houle Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Chris Pandolfi & Andy Hall, Debuts Dawes Cover In Denver [Video]

first_imgLoad remaining images Load remaining images Continuing their three-night run in Denver, on Friday night, Greensky Bluegrass returned to the Ogden Theatre for a fiery performance that saw Chris Pandolfi and Andy Hall of The Infamous Stringdusters, as well as Guido Batista, sit in during set one. The show also saw Greensky lay out a love-themed sandwich to close out set two and change the lyrics to refrence the band’s dobro player Anders Beck during their encore of “Frederico”.Turn On My Own Head: Greensky Bluegrass Returns To Denver With Improv & Cover-Heavy ShowThe band opened with “Windshield” off 2014’s If Sorrow Swims and worked teases of Phish’s “Harpua” throughout, making for an energized start to the performance. Pulling from their somewhat older catalog with a rendition of “Middle Mountain Towns”, the group then played Bill Monroe’s “Wheel Hoss”, made all the more complete with Paul Hoffman’s performance of the Macarena—a tune that the group gave a lot of love to recently during Strings & Sol.Greensky Bluegrass Cover Widespread Panic, Do “The Macarena” At Strings & Sol [Video]Shifting back to newer songs, next came a rendition of “Fixin’ To Ruin” featuring Guido Batista on woodblock before a cover of The Dillards’ “Reuben’s Train” and the band’s own “Cold Feet” off 2011’s Handguns. Joshua Davis’ “Last Winter In Copper Country” was up next before the group invited out The Infamous Stringdusters’ Chris Pandolfi and Andy Hall to help them close out the set for renditions of Greensky’s “I’d Probably Kill You”, Johnny Cash’s “Will The Circle Be Unbroken”, and The Dusters’ “No More To Leave You Behind”.“I’d Probably Kill You”[Video: Kyle Isaac]“Will The Circle Be Unbroken”[Video: Kyle Isaac]After the sit-in heavy close to set one, Greensky Bluegrass surprised fans once again, opening set two with their debut cover of Dawes’ “Quitter”. After “Living Over”, which featured references to their Johnny Cash tune, “Will The Circle Be Unbroken”, from set one, the group performed “Take Cover” off their newest album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted, using the tune as a vehicle for a number of “Jeopardy!” theme teases.To close out set two, the band gave the crowd lots of love during a “The Four” sandwich housing Bob Marley’s “Could You Be Loved”. The number also contained quotes from Burt Bacharach’s “What The World Needs Now” and The Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love”, most likely referencing My Morning Jacket’s love-filled New Year’s Eve celebration just outside of Denver at 1st Bank Center, during which MMJ played the two songs back-to-back.“Could You Be Loved”[Video: Kyle Isaac]For the group’s encore, the band played “Frederico”, though changed the lyrics to reference dobro player Anders Beck, with lyrics like “Anders is the name” and “Who is Anders?”“Frederico”[Video: Kyle Isaac]You can check out the setlist from last night’s performance below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | Ogden Theatre | Denver, CO | 1/12/2018Set One: Windshield (1), Middle Mountain Towns, Wheel Hoss (2), Fixin to Ruin (3), Rueben’s Train, Cold Feet, Last Winter in Copper Country (4), I’d Probably Kill You (5), Will the Circle be Unbroken (5), No More to Leave You Behind (5)Set Two: Quitter, Living Over (6), Take Cover (7)(8), Just to Lie > Eat my Dust, Working on a Building, Worried about the Weather > The Four > Could you be Love (9)(10) > The FourEncore: Frederico (11)(12)(1) – Harpua tease(2) – Macarena dance by Paul(3) – w/ Guido Batista (woodblock) x2(4) – Tarpology tease(5) – w/ Chris Pandolfi and Andy Hall(6) – Will the Circle be unbroken tease(7) – Jeopardy theme tease(8) – Contact tease(9) – what the World Needs Now quotes(10) – All you Need is love quotes(11) – Lyric change “Anders is the name…”(12) – Lyric change “Who is Anders”Check out the full gallery from photography Bill McAlaine below.center_img Greensky Bluegrass | Ogden Theatre | Denver, CO | 1/12/2018 | Photos by Bill McAlainelast_img read more

Phil Lesh & Friends Wrap ‘Day In Dead History’ Run With Grateful Dead Performance From 1972 [Videos]

first_imgPhil Lesh & Friends completed their “On This Day In Dead History” concert series on Sunday evening, which had started on Wednesday and continued over the weekend with a second performance on Friday. The series welcomed Deadheads and curious onlookers into Lesh’s Terrapin Crossroads concert venue in San Rafael, California for a run of performances recreating the setlists of notable Grateful Dead shows initially played on that day in history. The first two installments of the live series saw Phil and his band recreate shows from Long Beach Arena on 11/14/87 on Wednesday, followed by the Uptown Theater from 11/16/78 on Friday. With yet another strong show last night, Lesh and company confirmed the fact that regardless of how crazy the weekend may have been, one should never miss a Sunday show.For the final installment at Terrapin Crossroads on Sunday night, the former Dead bassist brought back the setlist from the Dead’s show at Houston’s Hofheinz Pavilion on 11/18/1972. Phil took the stage once again with the same lineup he’s used throughout this run, with Anders Osborne and Stu Allen on guitars, Steve Molitz on keys, Nathan Graham on drums and Elliott Peck helping out on vocals. The band started out with “The Promised Land”, “Sugaree”, and “Mexicali Blues”, and continued into “Black-Throated Wind” and “Tennessee Jed”.The band was then joined onstage by Phil’s son and Terrapin Family Band guitarist Grahame Lesh, who sat in for a mid-set run of “El Paso” of “Big Railroad Blues”. The band continued with Phil singing his own “Box of Rain” ballad from 1970’s American Beauty before welcoming Grahame back to the stage for “China Cat Sunflower” > “I Know You Rider”. The set would close out with a string of Dead hits in “Brown Eyed Women”, “Around & Around”, and “Casey Jones”.Set two began with a lively rendition of “Bertha”, which was still a setlist staple in many of the Dead’s performances from that era. The set then transitioned into “Greatest Story Ever Told” from Bob Weir‘s then-new solo album, Ace, before the band welcomed Grahame back to the stage for a pair of Dead ballads, “He’s Gone” and “Jack Straw”. Set two was, of course, filled with an abundance of lively dance tunes including “Playing In The Band”, “Sugar Magnolia”, and a weekend-appropriate “One More Saturday Night” closer. The one-song encore would also allow the band to showcase their vocal harmonies on “Uncle John’s Band” to close out the successful run.You can watch pro-shot videos from the performance below:Phil Lesh & Friends – “The Promised Land” – 11/18/18[Video: Nugs.net]Phil Lesh & Friends – “Bertha” – 11/18/18[Video: Nugs.net]With the success of these three time-traveling concerts, fans can assume that Phil and his friends will mount more of these “On This Day In Dead History” shows again in the near future. Until then, fans can tune into the second set audio from the original performance from 11/18/1972 to see how the band performed on Sunday compared to the Dead.Grateful Dead – 11/18/72 – Set Two[Audio: Uploaded by Jonathan Aizen]Setlist: Phil Lesh & Friends | Terrapin Crossroads | San Rafael, CA | 11/18/18Set One: The Promised Land, Sugaree, Mexicali Blues, Loser, Black Throated Wind, Tennessee Jed, El Paso*, Big Railroad Blues*, Box Of Rain*, China Cat Sunflower* > I Know You Rider*, Beat It On Down The Line, Brown Eyed Women, Around & Around*, Casey JonesSet Two: Bertha > Greatest Story Ever Told, He’s Gone*, Jack Straw*, Deal, Playing In The Band*, Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo*, Sugar Magnolia*, One More Saturday Night*Encore: Uncle John’s BandNotes: * with Grahame Leshlast_img read more

College explores school inequality

first_imgMcKenna said in order to make a change, more people need to care about the effects of poverty. A poor family lives on an income of $22,000 a year, she said. “There are 73 million children under the age of 17 in this country. Forty-one percent live in low-income families and 19 percent live in poor families,” McKenna said. “Part of that accountability means that we have to bring students up to their level in one or two year,” she said.”This allows for teachers to be able to teach the children in different ways.” “Educational inequality is not something that a small group of people can change. You need to tell other people and create a large group, and that will lead to real change,” Critchlow said. “Many of our students have issues with nutrition and health care. They have never seen a dentist. They have never had their eyes checked. They have never been taught about nutrition,” Jacobson-Reighter said. “This is because their parents do not have the means to provide these things.” Yolanda Turner-Smith, president of Xavier School of Excellence in South Bend, spoke about charter schools. Turner-Smith said many of the children who attend charter schools are not at their appropriate grade level. There are many children who are in the fifth grade but may be reading at a third grade level, she said. She also said charter schools have smaller class sizes and are funded by tax dollars. If a charter school is forced to close, it is usually due to financial issues, she said.Nancy Jacobson-Reighter, of the Coquillard Primary Center in South Bend, said Title I schools are government funded, which leads to an unequal distribution of funds between the schools. For students suffering from poverty, it affects every aspect of that student’s life, she said.center_img South Bend school representatives, from an elementary to university level, discussed how inequalities in education negatively affect students in a lecture at Saint Mary’s College Monday night. The lecture, titled “Equality and Education: The Faces and Facts,” began with Notre Dame professor Maria McKenna, who spoke about the problems of poverty and the education system in the United States today. “Charter schools in Indiana, as defined by the law, need to be unique, different and have high accountability,” Turner-Smith said. “This allows teachers to use different methods to reach children and teach them in different ways that they can understand.” “Three out of five kids are living in conditions where their food is not secure from day to day, their housing is questionable and positive interactions in their neighborhoods do not exist,” McKenna said. “I think the future of this country rides on the fact that we need to care enough about the child and their education for them to become productive citizens. But we are failing at that. Even though there are many people out there trying very hard to not fail, we are,” McKenna said. The event was sponsored by the Justice Education Department, the College Academy of Tutoring Program and The Katharine Terry Dooley Fund in Peace and Justice. Olivia Critchlow, assistant director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement, said there is a need to inform other people about these inequalities, and students can fill that need.last_img read more

Ban Calls for Central American and Mexican Regional Action against Organized Crime

first_img On 16 March, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called for a “regional” strategy against crime in Central America and Mexico, after meeting with the presidents of the isthmus in Guatemala. “Organized crime is not only a national phenomenon,” Ban warned, saying that progress needs to be made toward a “regional crime strategy in Central America and Mexico.” The Central American isthmus has become a very insecure region due to the activities of violent gangs and groups of traffickers moving drugs from South America to North America. Ban met in the Guatemalan capital with presidents Álvaro Colom (Guatemala), Laura Chinchilla (Costa Rica), and Porfirio Lobo (Honduras), as well as with the prime minister of Belize, Dean Barrow. Also participating in the meeting were vice presidents Juan Carlos Varela (Panama) and Rafael Alburquerque (Dominican Republic) and the foreign minister of El Salvador, Hugo Martínez. Nicaragua did not send representatives to the meeting with the UN head. Ban confirmed that the UN will participate in a meeting on Central American security to be held in Guatemala in June. The secretary-general made a forty-eight-hour visit to Guatemala to back the work of the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG), a body created by the UN in 2006 to support the country’s judicial system, considered corrupt and inefficient. “Stopping impunity is vital to protecting all Guatemalans from violence,” Ban said. “The United Nations will provide additional support to combat impunity and crime,” said Ban, who launched a UN fund to consolidate peace in Guatemala, fifteen years after the end of a bloody civil war. By Dialogo March 21, 2011last_img read more

Four Guerrillas Killed in Colombia

first_img “Four guerrillas, who have not yet been identified, have been killed,” the Colombian Air Force said on its website while announcing information about the joint operation that the Army and Navy carried out to destroy a FARC camp in Chocó. By Dialogo June 14, 2013 The operation also led to the seizure of “nine rifles, one pistol, important material for military intelligence, and two outboard motor boats,” according to the report. Four members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) were killed during a military operation in Chocó department, authorities reported on June 12. center_img After driving their armed struggle for 48 years, the FARC is the oldest guerrilla in Latin America, and currently has 8,000 members in its ranks. Since November, the FARC are holding peace negotiations with the government of President Juan Manuel Santos in Cuba, without a bilateral ceasefire in Colombia. last_img read more

Freeport Man Sentenced for Fatal DWI Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Freeport man was sentenced Monday to six to 18 years in prison for driving drunk and causing a crash that killed a 22-year-old man who was his passenger last year.Jonathan Sobrane, 38, had pleaded guilty in March at Nassau County court to vehicular homicide, assault and operating a motor vehicle while impaired by combined use of drugs or of alcohol and any drug or drugs.“It is unimaginable that drivers like Sobrane continue to risk the lives of their passengers and everyone else on our roads with such wildly reckless and dangerous behavior,” Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said.Prosecutors said Sobrane was speeding up to 90 mph eastbound on the Southern State Parkway in his Acura with three passengers when he clipped a Toyota Highlander, causing the Acura to spin off the road, hit trees and uproot a light pole at 3:40 a.m. on April 17, 2016.One of his passengers, Vito Errico, was ejected from the backseat, authorities said. He was found with the light pole lying across his chest and died as a result of his injuries.His other two passengers were also injured. One, a 23-year old woman, suffered a fractured femur and massive lacerations to her head that left her skull exposed. The other, a 21-year old man, sustained a broken arm and finger.The driver, who was not injured, was arrested at the scene by New York State Police.last_img read more

There’s no such thing as just a janitor

first_imgThere may be a movie someday about Richard Montañez. I wouldn’t bet against it.If you’ve eaten a Flamin’ Hot Cheeto, you have him to thank. His story (The Hustle) is the stuff of legends.Montañez is a first-generation Mexican immigrant. He had a hard time in school and eventually dropped out. He eventually landed a job as a janitor in a Frito-Lay plant in California.Before he started, his grandfather gave him advice.“Make sure that floor shines,” the man told his grandson. “And let them know that a Montañez mopped it.”Montañez decided he was going to be the “best janitor Frito-Lay had ever seen” — and he quickly made his presence known.“Every time someone walked into a room, it would smell fresh,” he says. “I realized there’s no such thing as ‘just a janitor’ when you believe you’re going to be the best.”Montañez worked hard, learning everything he could about Frito-Lay. When he heard the CEO of Frito-Lay urge employees to act like an owner, something was triggered within him.After nearly a decade mopping floors, Montañez gathered the courage to ask one of the Frito-Lay salesmen if he could tag along and learn more about the process.They went to a convenience store in a Latino neighborhood — and while the salesman restocked inventory, Montañez made a fortuitous observation: “I saw our products on the shelves and they were all plain: Lay’s, Fritos, Ruffles,” he recalls. “And right next to these chips happened to be a shelf of Mexican spices.”In that moment, he realized that Frito-Lay had “nothing spicy or hot.”A few weeks later, Montañez stopped at a local vendor to get some elote, a Mexican “street corn” doused in chili powder, salt, cotija, lime juice, and crema fresca. Cob in hand, a “revelation” struck: What if I put chili on a Cheeto?Montañez made his own prototype spicy Cheetos, and boldly set up a meeting with Frito-Lay’s CEO.Montañez stepped into the boardroom. “Here I was,” he says, “a janitor presenting to some of the most highly qualified executives in America.”At one point during the presentation, an executive in the room interjected: “How much market share do you think you can get?”“It hit me that I had no idea what he was talking about, or what I was doing,” Montañez recalled. “I was shaking, and I damn near wanted to pass out…[but] I opened my arms and I said, ‘This much market share!’ I didn’t even know how ridiculous that looked.”The room went silent as the CEO stood up and smiled. “Ladies and gentlemen, do you realize we have an opportunity to go after this much market share?” he said, stretching out his arms.He turned to Montañez. “Put that mop away, you’re coming with us.”Today, Montañez is the VP of multicultural sales for PepsiCo America – the holding company of Frito-Lay.His story is remarkable. And I think it all boils down to his mindset.Be the best at whatever you do. Be world-class. Whether with a mop. Or as a colleague. Or as a parent. Or with a Cheeto. 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Anthony Demangone Anthony Demangone is executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU). Demangone oversees day-to-day operations and manages the association’s education, membership, … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com/partner/nafcu Detailslast_img read more

Decline in production, and growth in imports of tomatoes. So much about the success of our tourism

first_imgPhoto: Pixabay.com Smart enough. About 60 percent of the total import of tomatoes to Croatia comes from Italy and the Netherlands, and we also import more than a ton from Spain, Germany and Poland. On the other hand, about two-thirds of total tomato exports end up in Slovenia and Germany. By the way, the import of fruits and vegetables is growing from year to year, and last year we imported 25 thousand tons more than in 2017. So much about the success of our tourism. Tomato production in Croatia fell in 2018 by almost 25 percent compared to the year before. Last year we produced 30950 tons, while we ended 2017 with 41223 tons of tomatoes produced.center_img On the other hand, say one Turkey, expects 50 million tourists this year, and strong Turkish agriculture products meet almost all the needs of both tourism and the population. Well, that is tourism, and not to encourage imports through tourism, as is the case in Croatia. In accordance with lower production, the Croatian Chamber of Commerce points out, exports also decreased, by about 30 percent. We exported 5287 tons last year, compared to 7505 tons in 2017. Imports, on the other hand, increased by five percent from 12813 tons in 2017 to 13369 tons in 2019. A kilogram of imported tomatoes last year cost an average of 0,99 euros, while for an export kilogram we received an average of five euro cents less.last_img read more

Secretary must stand up for public lands

first_imgAs our 26th president, Roosevelt worked tirelessly to stop special interests from developing and privatizing the wild lands that he treasured, conserving more than 230 million acres by establishing 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, four national game preserves, five national parks and 18 national monuments.Sportsmen have applauded Secretary Zinke for some of his Roosevelt-like actions, such as advocating for public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park and proposing the expansion of hunting and fishing on 10 national wildlife refuges.Yet, we will continue to hold the secretary accountable for pursuing the rollback of conservation protections on millions of acres of national monuments, scrapping collaborative habitat management plans for sage grouse, and not fighting administration proposals to cut popular public access programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund.These actions threaten to undermine Roosevelt’s legacy, and I join back-country hunters and anglers in urging Secretary Zinke to do the right thing and stand up for our public lands.John BaroneBallston SpaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGuilderland girls’ soccer team hands BH-BL first league loss Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion When Ryan Zinke was nominated by the Trump administration to oversee more than 500 million acres of our American public lands as interior secretary, sportsmen had high hopes that he would be, in his words, “a Teddy Roosevelt guy.”last_img read more